Double-Checking Your Facts

By Goldsborough, Reid | Information Today, November 2002 | Go to article overview

Double-Checking Your Facts


Goldsborough, Reid, Information Today


Say you're writing a report and need to double-check a fact or two. Or say you just heard something on TV or the radio and want to make sure it's correct. What do you do?

In the past, you reached for a print almanac or hardcover encyclopedia, or headed to the library. These days you're more likely to fire up Google (http://www.google.com), the best general-interest Web search engine. But despite its sophisticated search technology that helps you home in on relevant information, Google can still be too scattershot an approach when fact-checking.

Nothing beats an almanac for quick facts on everyday items, and nothing beats InfoPlease.com as a source for free online almanacs. It offers a range of almanacs that cover world and domestic issues, history and government, business, society and culture, biography, health and science, arts and entertainment, and sports-not to mention a dictionary, concise encyclopedia, and atlas.

For more meaty material, you should surf to a full-fledged online encyclopedia. Britannica Online includes the full text of Encyclopaedia Britannica (http://www.bri tannica.com), the world's best encyclopedia, along with a dictionary, thesaurus, atlas, audio and video clips, and links to other Web sites. You can read the first few sentences of encyclopedia articles for free, with full access costing $10 per month or $70 per year.

Though they're more concise, other excellent online encyclopedias include MSN Encarta (http://www.encarta.msn.com) and Encyclopedia.com.

Encarta, however, can be overloaded and slow, and some of its articles require you to have the CD-ROM version. Encyclopedia.com, along with providing free encyclopedia articles, includes links to eLibrarya compilation of articles from thousands of newspapers, magazines, and TV and radio transcripts-for $25 per month or $125 per year.

The best biographical encyclopedia on the Web is Biography.com (http://www.bi ography.com), with more than 25,000 articles on both current and historical figures.

If it's word wisdom you're after, Dictionary.com may have it. It offers a dictionary and thesaurus as well as translation tools for Spanish, French, German, Italian, and Portuguese. The site also includes links to foreign language, medical, science, and other dictionaries. An even more comprehensive translation site is AltaVista's Babelfish (http://world.altavista.com/tr). It handles the above languages plus Russian, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

Another good word site is YourDictionary .com. Along with English-language and foreign-language dictionaries and various thesauri, it provides links to 60 specialized glossaries, from business and computing to law and medicine.

Say you come across an acronym that doesn't make sense.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Double-Checking Your Facts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.