Goal Orientations, Locus of Control and Academic Achievement in Prospective Teachers: An Individual Differences Perspective

By Bulus, Mustafa | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

Goal Orientations, Locus of Control and Academic Achievement in Prospective Teachers: An Individual Differences Perspective


Bulus, Mustafa, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the prospective teachers' locus of control in goal orientations and of both orientations in academic achievement. The participants were 270 undergraduate students studying in different majors at the Faculty of Education in Pamukkale University. Goal Orientations and Locus of Control Scales were used to gather the data. Pearson Correlation and regression analyses were performed to analyze the data. Results showed that mastery goal orientation was positively and avoidant goal orientation was negatively related with locus of control and academic achievement. A positive relationship was found between locus of control and academic achievement. In the study regression analyses indicated that mastery and avoidance goal orientations were predicted by locus of control and academic achievement was predicted by goal orientations and locus of control together. Implications of the findings were discussed and suggestions were given for the educators.

Key Words

Goal Orientations, Locus of Control, Academic Achievement, Prospective Teachers.

Prospective teacher's behaviours depend on many crucial characteristics which could be defined as the individual-difference variables or conceptualized as the sources of personal differences.

Some of these relate to the individual directly. Among them "goal orientations" and "locus of control" constructs take an important role. Because as literature revealed, both orientations have meaningful relationships with the affective, cognitive, and behavioral reactions of students in and out of school settings and academic achievement (Chubb, Fertman & Ross, 1997; Diener & Dweck, 1978; Dweck & Leggett, 1988; Eliot & Church, 1997; Nelson & Mathias, 1995; Rose & Medway, 1981; Seifert, 1995). Therefore, the "goal orientations" and "locus of control" constructs have received considerable attention in psychological and educational researches. However, there is little research documenting the relationships between the prospective teachers' goal and locus of control orientations and the two constructs' role in academic achievement together. Additionally, the need to understand the nature of the relations between various theories and thus to explain the differences in the quality of students' behaviours is obvious. Following this view, the primary goal of the present study was to examine the role of the prospective teachers' locus of control in their goal orientations and of both orientations in academic achievement.

Theories of motivation focus on the importance of motivational characteristics in order to predict the students' learning behaviors and performances. In that respect, expectancy/value theorists (Eccles, 1987; Eccles & Wigfield, 1995; Meece, Wigfield & Eccles, 1990; Wigfield, 1994; Wigfield & Eccles, 1992, 2000) propose that individual's expectancies and the value given to the task determine the achievement behavior. Consistent with this view, social-cognitive theory of motivation (Dweck, 1986; Dweck & Leggett, 1988) postulates that there is a relationship between a person's goal orientations and his/her responses in academic settings. Within this social-cognitive framework, achievement goal theory has developed in motivational researches.

The primary focus of goal orientation theory is on how students think about themselves, their tasks and their performance (Dweck &Leggett, 1988).

According to the goal theory, the motives that the students used to complete their tasks are called as goal orientations (Ames, 1992; Dweck, 1986). Recently, many researchers have adopted a goal orientation framework and labeled different types of goals such as learning versus performance (Elliot & Dweck, 1988; Miller, Behrens, Greene & Newman, 1993); task versus ego (Fox, Goudes, Biddle, Duda & Armstrong, 1994); mastery versus performance (Ames & Archer, 1988); and task mastery, egosocial, and work-avoidant (Meece, Blumenfeld & Hoyle, 1988; Meece & Holt, 1993; Nolen & Haladyna, 1990). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Goal Orientations, Locus of Control and Academic Achievement in Prospective Teachers: An Individual Differences Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.