Finding Acceptance of Bloom's Revised Cognitive Taxonomy on the International Stage and in Turkey

By Ari, Asim | Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

Finding Acceptance of Bloom's Revised Cognitive Taxonomy on the International Stage and in Turkey


Ari, Asim, Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri


Abstract

The aim of this study is to define academic staff's attitude about Bloom's Revised Cognitive Taxonomy working in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. In accordance with this aim a scale developed by the researcher was applied to the academic staff in August and September 2010. The internal consistency reliability coefficient was calculated for the reliability analysis of scale and Cronbach's Alpha was found .84. The universe of research consisted of academic staff of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. It was tried to contact with 420 academic staff without sampling by sending the developed scale via e-mail. However, 174 academic staff from 28 countries were willing to participate in the research, so the sample of the research consisted of 174 units. 28 countries consisting of the research group were categorized as countries of Europe, Africa, America and Asia. Five groups with Turkey group were formed and statistics were applied to these groups. Finally, in the research it was defined that Bloom's Revised Cognitive Taxonomy was useful and applicable according to academic staff.

Key Words

Bloom's Taxonomy, Goals, Revised Taxonomy, Curriculum Development.

Educational objectives are desirable characteristics acquired by education (Ertürk, 1997; Varis, 1996). The desirable characteristics are acquirements, skills, capabilities, interests, habits, attitudes, etc. While objectives are the main component and determining factor of the programme, content, educational circumstances and evaluation factors are designed according to the goals (Demirel, 2003; Erden, 1995; Kisakürek, 1983; Sönmez, 2007). Educational objectives have been classified and interpreted in a variety of ways (O'Neil & Murphy, 2010).

Bloom's Original Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain

Being completed in 1956 and published in a book, Bloom's Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain consists of six levels. Each level is subsumed by the higher levels in that it is hierarchical from simple to more complex. As the lowest level of cognitive domain is knowledge, it succesively follows comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Mastery of each "lower" category was a prerequisite for achieving mastery of the next "higher" category. While knowledge, comprehension and application are accepted as lower levels, analyze, synthesis and evaluation are accepted as higher cognitive levels (Bloom, 1956; Krathwohl, 2009; Küçükahmet, 2005; Oliva, 1988; Wulf & Schave, 1984).

Bloom's Original classification is cumulative and hierarchical. It is cumulative as each level consists of behaviours of previous level and hierarchical as the levels are designed from simple to more complex. It is seen some limitations and deficiencies in applying the Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive domain. The very structure of the Taxonomy, moving from the simplest level of knowledge to the most difficult level of evaluation is seen as an important deficiency. For example, some objectives of knowledge level are more complex than some objectives of analyze and evaluation in some situations. In addition to this, it is stated evaluation level isn't more complex than synthesis and synthesis level contains evaluation level (Amer, 2006).

Another criticism about progressive classification is hierarchical classification in that mastery of each "lower" category was a prerequisite for achieving mastery of the next "higher" category. However, in some fields before mastering behaviours belonging to a level, other behaviours belonging to a higher level can be seen. Take a literary critic as an example. Although he can't write an original novel (synthesis level according to taxonomy) he can evaluate a written novel (evaluation level according to taxonomy). Further, according to some experts the hierarchical classification is not regarded proper for each subject field (Senemoglu, 2007).

During the term original taxonomy was published, curriculum and instruction was highly influenced by behaviouralism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Finding Acceptance of Bloom's Revised Cognitive Taxonomy on the International Stage and in Turkey
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.