Baby Boomers Are Redefining Retirement: Our Experts Examine the Impact on HR

By Anfuso, Dawn | Workforce, December 1997 | Go to article overview

Baby Boomers Are Redefining Retirement: Our Experts Examine the Impact on HR


Anfuso, Dawn, Workforce


Baby boomers. Seventy-six million people strong, this group has been and continues to be the core sphere of influence on American life. From movies and music to clothing styles and coffee bars, just about everything in modern society reflects the mass of those born between 1946 and 1964, collectively known as baby boomers.

The workplace, especially, has experienced the power of this group to effect change. It was boomers who fought for legislation on discrimination, flexibility and benefits coverage. They ushered in casual dress, work/ life programs and wellness initiatives. Nothing, in fact, has happened in the last 30 years in the workplace that doesn't reflect the attitudes of this homogeneous yet diverse group.

Last year, the eldest of the baby boomers turned 50. As the media highlighted this event with much fanfare, the editors of WORKFORCE pondered: What does this mean for the workplace and for HR managers? We began collecting articles, reports and surveys. We interviewed consultants, academicians and HR professionals. In short, we were on a mission to discover the impact on the workplace.

The following 19 pages are the result of that mission. The bottom line is, as they've been doing for 50 years, boomers will affect nearly every aspect of workforce management as they head toward retirement. …

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