Clinical Training at an Explicitly Integrative Program: Rosemead School of Psychology

By Cimbora, David M. | Journal of Psychology and Christianity, Summer 2011 | Go to article overview

Clinical Training at an Explicitly Integrative Program: Rosemead School of Psychology


Cimbora, David M., Journal of Psychology and Christianity


Clinical training for the doctoral level graduate programs of clinical psychology at Rosemead School of Psychology, Biola University, is described. Rosemead School of Psychology consists of two doctoral programs: a Ph.D. program based on a scholar-practitioner model and a Psy.D. program based on a practitioner-scholar model. Basic philosophy of clinical training across both programs is detailed. Other aspects that are discussed include collaboration with the professional community, Christian integrative elements, challenges and opportunities, and future directions for clinical training. Focus is also given to the overall current state of clinical training within doctoral level clinical psychology education

The methods by which we train students in doctoral level clinical psychology programs have been an important area of study over the past several decades. We have seen efforts that examine clinical training within research-oriented Boulder model programs (e.g., Drab man 1985; Hunt & Wisocki, 2008; Maddux & Riso, 2007;) and practitioner-oriented Vail model (professional psychology) programs (e.g., Ducheny, 2010). Still others have examined training constructs across models (e.g., Perry & Boccaccini, 2009). We also have seen significant discourse on current issues facing clinical training (e.g., internship match imbalance, model licensing laws, elimination of the post-doctoral training year, standards for practica). In the past decade, there has been increased attention given to the role of diversity in training. Of particular interest to many has been the role of religion and spirituality within the context of clinical training and practice (e.g., Brawer, Handal, Fabricatore, Roberts, & Wajda-Johnston, 2002; Campbell, 2007; Jones, 2007; Kruse & Aten, 2007; Pargament, 2007; Richards & Bergin, 2005). Until now, a systematic exploration of how Christian clinical psychology programs conduct clinical training has not been undertaken. In 2004, the Journal of Psychology and Christianity focused on the role of scholarship within such programs (e.g., Hill, Hall, & Pike, 2004). In a similar way, this special edition, by focusing on clinical training, fills an important void in the literature.

Rosemead School of Psychology is one of the six schools of Biola University, a non-denominational private university in La Mirada, CA, just outside of Los Angeles. The mission of Biola University "is biblically centered education, scholarship and service - equipping men and women in mind and character to impact the world for the Lord Jesus Christ." More specifically, Rosemead's mission is to advance the integration of a biblical and psychological understanding of the human condition, and to apply that understanding toward the relief of human suffering. In the pages that follow, the clinical training component of Rosemead School of Psychology's graduate programs in clinical psychology will be presented. Five specific areas will be addressed: 1) the basic philosophy of clinical training at Rosemead; 2) collaboration and interface with the professional community; 3) integration, and how it is addressed through clinical training at Rosemead; 4) rewards and challenges of clinical training; and 5) new directions for the future.

Basic Philosophy

Overview

Rosemead School of Psychology began in 1970 in Rosemead, California, as a free-standing professional school. Seven years later, Rosemead became incorporated into what is now known as Biola University, moving its location to La Mirada, approximately 15 miles east of Los Angeles. Rosemead consists of two graduate programs in clinical psychology, one leading to the Ph.D. and the other to the Psy.D., as well as a B. A. degree from the undergraduate psychology program. The Psy.D. program was accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) in 1982, and the Ph.D. program was accredited in 1985. The main focus of both of the doctoral programs is to train practicing clinicians. …

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