Politics in China: An Introduction

By Dittmer, Lowell | The China Journal, July 2011 | Go to article overview

Politics in China: An Introduction


Dittmer, Lowell, The China Journal


Politics in China: An Introduction, edited by William A. Joseph. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. xviii + 437 pp. US$99.00 (hardcover), US$39.95 (paperback).

This 437-page book, available in paperback as well as hardcover, is both a useful "introduction" to Chinese politics (as it is modestly subtitled) and "unique book", as William A. Joseph contends more boldly in his preface. It is useful because it provides a quite comprehensive and up-to-date overview of nearly every dimension of Chinese politics that one might deem pertinent, yet it is also unique (or at least unusual) in at least two respects. First, its coverage is really quite comprehensive, ranging from the Guangxu emperor to Hu Jintao and his likely successor Xi Jinping, and from public health and the environmental crisis to the future of electoral democracy in Hong Kong. Second, the selection of contributing chapter writers is excellent: thus, we have Keith Schoppa on the fall of the Qing, Frederick Teiwes on the Maoist era, Tyrene Whyte on population planning, Robert Barnett on Tibet, David Zweig on political economy, Richard Kraus on the arts, Shelley Rigger on Taiwan, and so forth.

After an introduction by Joseph that discusses methodology and a sampling of prospective analytical frameworks, and provides an overview of China's geographic and demographic basics, the book consists of four parts. The first part reviews the country's political history, including chapters by Schoppa on the fall of the dynasty and Teiwes on Mao, ably followed by Bruce Gilley on the reform era. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Politics in China: An Introduction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.