Run for 2011-12 National Student Unit Office!

Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Run for 2011-12 National Student Unit Office!


It's time to put your leadership skills into action! Your pursuit of an FCS degree makes you a natural for a leadership position. Gain a head start on your future and serve the national AAFCS Student Unit (SU) as an officer! You'll participate in regular meetings, serve on national committees, and influence association programs and benefits. Visit http://www.aafcs.org/Membership/Students.asp for officer duties and the online application.

Hear what the current officers have to say about their SU service:

"For the past 3 years, when the Annual Conference date inches closer and closer, I begin getting excited like a kid on Christmas morning! We, as a group of officers, work hard all year getting activities and SU members ready and united for the annual meeting. It is such a wonderful feeling to put our goals into reality! I also enjoy the time that I spend with people from across the country who have the same passion as me-family and consumer sciences! I have gained so much through the past 3 years and would not trade that time for anything!"

- Linsey Johnson

"My favorite part of being an SU officer has been to network with professionals through various committees of AAFCS. I am part of the Development Committee and have learned the importance of funding our organization to provide opportunities to students and professionals. One of my favorite experiences has been attending the Annual Conference. I was so inspired by the amazing individuals who make up this organization and became much more passionate about family and consumer sciences." -Kyley Brooks

"Having an officer role has been a growing and rewarding experience. I have grown as a young professional through teamwork and collaboration. Being an SU officer has prepared me for decision making that will occur between other professionals and me in the future. It has been rewarding for several reasons, but the most significant has been developing methods to increase student attendance at the Annual Conference by offering new sessions and roles for students. …

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