Seven Billion (7,000,000,000) in 2011

Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Seven Billion (7,000,000,000) in 2011


In 1960, the world's population was 3 billion, 15 years later in 1975 it was 4 billion (who do you know who experienced these population events?) It is expected that by the end of 2011, the world's population will reach 7 billion-this dynamic (from 3 to 7 billion) has occurred in 51 years. Often these difficult-to-comprehend numbers have been reached without the exploration of the implications and trends for present or future.

The growing demands on the earth's resources and the complexity of decisions individuals, families, communities and nations face to alleviate poverty, pollution, and poor health are a few of the issues. By focusing attention on the 7 billion, we might find reaching 8 billion less onerous. Everyone's future is affected and all should be asking What will life be like in 2050 or 2070? Meanwhile, what attention will be given by FCS to this growth in world population?

Check out the World of 7 Billion (http://wwwworldof7billion.org/) and its population clocks (displays current population numbers in the world and in the United States as change occurs). Visit the site for one day and become aware of the growth that occurs in just 24 hours, a week, a month. How much time passes before 10, 100, 1,000, 10,000, or 100,000 have been added to our country or world? The site includes teacher resources for lesson plans on population dynamics, environmental connections, and social connections-each are relevant for FCS classrooms or FCCLA projects. Many of the lessons can be adapted to community groups. The site includes a contest for the best 30-second public service announcements on the 7 Billion topic (grades 9-12), due by March 1, 2011. …

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