Bands on the Run


CHRISTOPHER BAILEY, THE CREATIVE GENIUS BEHIND BURBERRY, WANTS YOU TO LISTEN UP.

Music and fashion have long been happy bedfellows, especially in Britain. You need only try to imagine the Sex Pistols without Vivienne Westwood's spiked collars and safety pins, or the New Romantics without her famous Pirate collection, to appreciate the fusion between rock and style. And it's hard to think of the early Beatles without picturing their colarless suits, influenced by Pierre Cardin's slim, sleek designs of the 1950s, or Mick Jagger without seeing him in Ossie Clark's fabulous jumpsuits and snakeskin jackets. But Burberry's Christopher Bailey has taken that relationship a step further. He's not only dressing pop stars, he's using the power of his label to give them exposure, too. Burberry Acoustic, a website launched last year, is a trove of tenderly filmed acoustic sets by young, talented Brits, many unsigned, who have come to Bailey's attention. It's a bold undertaking, but a succesful one that shows how a brand's global reach canbeusedto nurture and champion the next generation of rock stars. For this issue of Out, we photographed and interviewed three of the bands and artists hosted on Burberry Acoustic, and invited Bailey to submit a playlist of his favorite songs, which you can find on Out.com.

Lite in Film

(From left: Micky Osment, Edward Ibbotson, Dominic Sennett, Samuel Fry)

SOUNDS LIKE: Phoenix meets the La's

FROM: Hackney, London

WHAT THEY SAY: "We're quite diverse in our influences, but our roots are solidly in classic English rock like the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and the Smiths. We're all quite melodic in what we play."

LOVES: Dominic: the Beach Boys, Motown.

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