At the Crossroads: Not-for-Profit Leadership Strategies for Executives and Boards

By Sidiqi, Nadir | Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship, July 2011 | Go to article overview

At the Crossroads: Not-for-Profit Leadership Strategies for Executives and Boards


Sidiqi, Nadir, Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship


At The Crossroads: Not-For-Profit Leadership Strategies for Executives and Boards Philip Goltoff WILEY (2010), 181 Pages, hardback, $ 27.95

Running a not-for-profit organization requires a dedicated staff along with highly committed board members. Dedication and commitment are important in order to overcome the challenges they are likely to face and to successfully move forward toward the achievement of the organization's mission. Staff members must understand the funding needs, donation collection process, accountability, being fair and transparent with the donors, and the communities they intend to serve nationally or internationally. In this book, At the Crossroads: Not-For-Profit Leadership Strategies for Executives and Boards, Philip Goltoff writes in a reader-friendly and conversational manner about the internal and external dimensions of not-forprofit organizations. In his writing, he provides different points of views on how employees and volunteers can best serve their constituents.

Responsibility and transparency are important elements of success for every not-for-profit organization. The book provides numerous examples on serving the entire community and taking responsibility in different situations such as 9/11, earthquakes, disasters, and tsunamis. The author emphasizes the transparency dimension of not-for-profits by encouraging employees to make the organization's outcomes and results visible to the public. Similar to other organizations, two other important factors for the success of a not-for-profit institution are effective communication and proper networking skills with others in the community. Another important factor for success is securing funds in a timely manner. This book highlights and emphasizes the following elements when working in a not-for-profit institution:

1. Understanding the roles and responsibilities of the not-for-profit to the community.

2. Providing public reflections and feedback through the social work of professional managers and the CEO.

3. Focusing on priority issues based on needs, public policy and government relations.

4. Securing the needed resources and tools which help in making sure leaders and teams have what they need to be successful.

5. Creating a cohesive environment between the board of directors and the chief executive officer.

6. Raising money, managing budgets and creating strong relationships through advance planning.

7. Evaluating and training human resources to bring about relevant changes in the organization. …

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