Fighting for the Forty-Ninth Star: C. W. Snedden and the Crusade for Alaska Statehood

By Ritter, Harry | Journalism History, Summer 2011 | Go to article overview

Fighting for the Forty-Ninth Star: C. W. Snedden and the Crusade for Alaska Statehood


Ritter, Harry, Journalism History


Cole, Terrence. Fighting for the Forty-Ninth Star: C. W. Snedden and the Crusade for Alaska Statehood. Fairbanks: University of Alaska Foundation, 2010. 502 pp. $30.

This book's narrative and interpretive scope is considerably broader than its title suggests. True, the study's main reference point is CW Snedden, a Grand Old Party partisan, a Fairbanks booster, and die owner and publisher of the Fairbanks Daily NewsMiner from 1950 to 1989. Terrence Cole, a University of Alaska historian, argues that he played a key but underappreciated part, both nationally and locally, in the 1958 attainment of Alaska statehood.

The book's first third is a concise history of the News-Miner and its pioneer publishers from gold rush days to its acquisition by Snedden, who was a newcomer to Alaska from Vancouvei, Washington, in 1950. Along the way, one leains much of life's texture in frontier Fairbanks. But the study expands from Faiibanks to Washington, D. C, to comprise a convincing explanation of the Alaska and related Hawaii statehood issues in the context of federal political dynamics and congressional civil rights debates of the 1950s. Many arguments were advanced by opponents of Alaska statehood, such as the regions non-contiguity with the lower forty-eight states and its small population and inadequate tax base.

There was a matter of Realpolitik as well: Republicans, including President Dwight D. Eisenhower, expected a newly minted state of Alaska to elect Democrats to Congress while Hawaii was expected to return Republicans. The problem was reversed in the eyes of Democratic strategists. But the key obstacle, according to Cole, was the determination of southern segregationist Democrats to block the addition of Alaskan and Hawaiian congressional members - of whatever party - who would likely support civil rights legislation and break the power of southern filibusters. This interface between Alaska and Hawaii statehood and the crisis of the residual Old Souths congressional power was deliberately repressed in the 1950s debates because its explicit acknowledgment would have been too explosive to serve the goals of any of the contesting factions. Cole credits Roger Bell, the author of the 1984 analysis Last Among Equals on the politics of Hawaii statehood, as the only previous scholar to sufficiently stress this theme.

Among the heroes of Cole's story, aside from Snedden, are Eisenhower's Interior Secretary Fred Seaton, a former small-town newspaper publisher like Snedden, who became his friend and convinced a reluctant Eisenhower to endorse Alaska's admission to the union; Bob Bartlett, Alaska's Democratic territorial delegate to Congress, who employed a sensitive, self-effacing style to lobby for statehood; Ted Stevens, Snedden's protégeas Fairbanks U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fighting for the Forty-Ninth Star: C. W. Snedden and the Crusade for Alaska Statehood
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.