The California School Psychologist Becomes Contemporary School Psychology: CSP Continues to Link Theory and Practice

By Hass, Michael | Contemporary School Psychology, January 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

The California School Psychologist Becomes Contemporary School Psychology: CSP Continues to Link Theory and Practice


Hass, Michael, Contemporary School Psychology


This first volume of Contemporary School Psychology marks yet another important milestone in the efforts of the California Association of School Psychologists (CASP) to provide its members and the profession with timely and practical scholarship. As we celebrate this accomplishment, it is important to acknowledge that this inaugural issue builds on the significant accomplishments of The California School Psychologist and the work of past editors and associate editors Shane Jimerson, Michael Furlong, Brent Duncan, Stephen Brock, Kristin Powers and Marilyn Wilson. Their efforts have provided the foundation on which this inaugural issue of Contemporary School Psychology builds.

In June of 2010, the current editorial team, Kelly Kennedy, Brian Leung and I, proposed that CASP change the name of The California School Psychologist to Contemporary School Psychology. The goal was to give the journal a name that would both reflect its breadth of scholarship - many authors outside of California have often contributed articles - and enhance the ability of the journal to attract high quality scholarship from a wider pool of authors. Ultimately, this is in service of the journal's prime goal of continuing to be, as Shane Jimerson put it in his introduction to the 2009 issue of the California School Psychologist, an "...invaluable resource for faculty, students, and practitioners in school psychology across the state of California." (Jimerson, 2009, p.3). Our new name communicates our commitment to continue this tradition and our aspiration to become a valuable resource for faculty, students, and practitioners nationwide.

Contemporary School Psychology is devoted to current issues in school psychology with the goal of publishing high-quality articles that make explicit the connection between theory and practice. The journal seeks to provide a venue for articles that: (1) critically review research on topics of general interest to school psychologists nationwide, (2) report research relevant to practicing school psychologists, (3) present promising practices or programs that address the needs of children and youth, and (4) critically reflect on the profession of school psychology and the challenges faced by the profession. As before, the intent of the journal is to highlight the diversity of viewpoints in the field and of the students, parents, and communities we serve.

This first issue of Contemporary School Psychology begins with a special topic section that includes five articles that address innovative applications of a public health approach to school psychology practice. These innovations include how directors of special education view Response to Intervention (RtI) at the secondary level, applications of RtI to promoting mental health and positive behavior, prevention and treatment of selective mutism, and applications of a problem-solving model to struggling readers who need intense interventions. …

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