Many Thanks to All

By Johnston, William D. | Judicature, July/August 2011 | Go to article overview

Many Thanks to All


Johnston, William D., Judicature


With this final President's Report, I offer thanks for the privilege and pleasure of serving as president of the American Judicature Society during the past year.

I have been grateful for so many opportunities, such as:

* Working with Executive Director Seth Andersen and the other outstanding members of AJS staff in Des Moines and Chicago;

* Working with other AJS Board members and officers, and with the members of the National Advisory Council (and NAC chair Marty Belsky); and

* Working with Chief Justice Richard Teitelman, AJS' Delegate to the American Bar Association House of Delegates.

I have very much appreciated the time and talent contributed by die members of the Society's numerous centers, committees, and task forces. Special thanks to the Membership Committee Ruth Mclntyre) , the Corporate and Law Firm Benefactor Committee (Tom Leighton and Ivan Lui-Kwan), the Editorial Committee (Larry Baum, Cathy Silak, and Peter Webster), the Task Force on Judicial Independence (Neal Sonnett), and the Centennial Planning Committee (Ruth Mclntyre and Larry Okinaga).

AJS has benefited immeasurably from the contributions of outgoing Board members Dean John Carroll, Professor Alex Reinert, Tony Richardson, and Chief Justice Rick Teitelman. We wish them the best for all continued success.

I have tried to use the "bully pulpit" that the presidency of AJS affords to promote access to justice - whether through President's Reports^ letters to the editor, or speaking engagements. Tve celebrated AJS as a membership organization; called for continued judicial selection reform efforts, in the face of repeated attacks on the state and federal judiciary; and decried the incivility that is eroding our justice system and the rule of law. In doing so, I have always been aware that whatever thoughts I've shared have been against a backdrop of nearly a century of efforts on the part of'AjS to improve the administration of justice. In short, I've probably said little that is new. But I hope that what I've said has provided some helpful emphasis. …

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Many Thanks to All
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