Cinematic Illuminations: The Middle Ages on Film

By Harty, Kevin J. | Arthuriana, July 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Cinematic Illuminations: The Middle Ages on Film


Harty, Kevin J., Arthuriana


LAURIE A. FIKE and MARTIN B. SHICHTMAN, Cinematic Illuminations: The Middle Ages on Film. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010. Pp. xi +445. ISBN: 978-0-8018-9345-2. $60.00 (HB). $30.00 (PB).

The study of cinema medievalia in general and of cinema arthuriana in particular is fast becoming a fair field full of folk thanks to a number of recent studies of the cinematic tradition of reimagining the Middle Ages. Queer Movie Medievalisms, edited by Kathleen Coyne Kelly and Tison Pugh (Ashgate, 2009), with its dozen essays bookended by an introduction and an afterword, focuses on the ways in which such films undercut medieval and modern constructions of gender and sexuality. Medieval Film, edited by Anke Bernau and Bettina Bildhauer (Manchester University Press, 2009), provides an introduction by the editors, eight essays, and suggestions for further readings. The focus here is on interdisciplinarity, as the contributors ask us to think about what it means to create and watch a 'medieval' film. Race, Class, and Gender in 'Medieval' Cinema, edited by Lynn T. Ramey and Tison Pugh (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), includes thirteen essays discussing multicultural identity, barbarism, the medieval other, and romantic values in films set in more or less recognizably medieval worlds. Medieval and Early Modern Film and Media by Richard Burt (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) links so-called 'medieval' film to such examples of old and new media as scrolls, illuminated manuscripts, the Bayeux Tapestry, and DVDs and HD DVDs. Le Moyen Âge mis en scène: perspectives contemporaines, edited by Sandra Gorgievski and Xavier Leroux (Babel, vol. 15, 2007), contains fifteen essays by British, American, and European scholars discussing the Middle Ages as an object of both representation and interpretation in modern theater and film. Portrayals of Joan of Arc in Film by Margaret Joan Maddox (Edwin Mellen, 2008) amounts, unfortunately, to little more than a facile discussion of a topic definitively discussed in greater depth by Robin Blaetz in her Visions of the Maid (University Press of Virginia, 2001).

But, despite these and other volumes, Cinematic Illuminations by Laurie A. Finke and Martin B. Shichtman will remain the definitive study of the continuing phenomenon of cinematic reinterpretations of the Middle Ages. The book-like the authors' earlier King Arthur and the Myth of History-is a model of solid, insightful, groundbreaking prose unfettered by academic jargon and vigorous in its adherence to the highest tenets of academic integrity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cinematic Illuminations: The Middle Ages on Film
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.