Pervez Musharraf on Bin Laden Controversy, U.S.-Pakistan Relations

By Lahlou, Alia | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, November 2011 | Go to article overview

Pervez Musharraf on Bin Laden Controversy, U.S.-Pakistan Relations


Lahlou, Alia, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf delivered an address on "The State of the U.S.- Pakistan Relationship" at a July 22 event hosted by the Woodrow Wilson Center, in Washington, DC. In her introduction, former congresswoman (D-CA) and now Wilson Center president Jane Harman outlined some of the challenges that have affected the relationship between the two nations, including Pakistani sales of nuclear technology to North Korea in 2005, the contested 2007 elections, Benazir Bhutto's assassination, and the recent controversy surrounding Osama bin Laden. Retired General Musharraf spoke at length about the trust deficit between the United States and Pakistan. He was saddened to see the deterioration of the relationship, he said, especially after years of cooperation when he was chief executive, from 1999 to 2001, and president, from 2001 to 2008.

"Pakistan finds itself in the eye of the terrorism storm," said Musharraf, as he presented an historical overview of the rise of militant extremism in the region. Placing today's extremist groups in the context of U.S. and Pakistani efforts to fight the Soviets after the 1979 invasion of Afghanistan, he dubbed the years 1989-00 a "period of disaster," as the U.S. "abandoned" the region after the fall of the Soviet Union and retreated without any rehabilitation of the mujahideen, who had been "armed to the teeth" and who coalesced into today's al-Qaeda.

Musharraf reminded the audience that Pakistan has been allied with the West since its creation in 1947. Since 1989, however, he said, there has been a policy shift against Islamabad, with India becoming a strategic ally in South Asia. Pakistan was "used, ditched and betrayed," Musharraf said.

Public antipathy toward the U.S. is a result of the latter's meddling with Pakistan's affairs, the general continued. Many Pakistanis view the U.S. condemnation of Pakistan's nuclear program as an affront to their national pride. Pakistan's nuclear program is the guarantor of its integrity and security, Musharraf said. He called the "indiscriminate" U.S. drone attacks and the collateral damage they cause, along with the American strike against bin Laden inside Pakistan, an assault on Pakistan's sovereignty. Regarding the ongoing controversy over bin Laden's assassination, Musharraf refuted allegations that Pakistani authorities were complicit in protecting or shielding the al-Qaeda leader. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pervez Musharraf on Bin Laden Controversy, U.S.-Pakistan Relations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.