Female Downstream-Hatching Migration of the River Shrimp Macrobrachium Ohione in the Lower Mississippi River and the Atchafalaya River

By Olivier, Tyler J.; Bauer, Raymond T. | The American Midland Naturalist, October 2011 | Go to article overview

Female Downstream-Hatching Migration of the River Shrimp Macrobrachium Ohione in the Lower Mississippi River and the Atchafalaya River


Olivier, Tyler J., Bauer, Raymond T., The American Midland Naturalist


ABSTRACT.-The shrimp Macrobrachium ohione (Decapoda, Caridea) was once numerous in the Mississippi River System (MRS) as far north as the Missouri and lower Ohio Rivers but is now abundant only within the lower Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Adult M. ohione live and breed in fresh water, but larval development occurs in brackish and marine waters, a life history pattern termed amphidromy. A downstream female "hatching" migration may ensure that the stage-1 larvae reach the required salinity in time for the critical molt to stage-2 (first feeding larval stage). This study tested the hypothesis that embryo-bearing females deliver larvae to the estuaries of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers in Louisiana. To test the prediction of a downstream migration, this investigation examined the reproductive condition and the spatial-temporal distribution of reproductive-sized females during 2008 and 2009. Shrimps were collected by trapping at downstream (Pass A Loutre, Atchafalaya Delta) and upstream (St. Francisville, Butte La Rose) locations within the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, respectively. During M. ohione's reproductive season, a significandy larger proportion of females incubating embryos at any stage of development were observed downstream in the Atchafalaya River (AR) but not in the Mississippi River (MR). However, in the MR, a positive association between the proportion of females incubating near-hatching embryos and the downstream sample site was found in both years. In the AR, a similar association was found in 2009 but not in 2008. Females with near-spawning ovaries were positively associated with the downstream sites in the MR in 2009 and the AR in 2008. During the reproductive season, females in both the AR and MR were observed with near-spawning ovaries while simultaneously incubating near-hatching embryos. Thus, females may produce multiple broods during the reproductive season. In general, relative abundance (Catch Per Unit Effort) of reproductive-sized females was higher at downstream sites during the reproductive season. However, the predicted seasonal increase into downstream sites was statistically significant only in the AR in 2008. Overall, results of this study support the hypothesis that reproductive females migrate downstream to deliver larvae to the sea in both the AR and MR. Nevertheless, the exact mechanics of the migrations may vary with river characteristics such as length and water velocity.

INTRODUCTION

Macrobrachium ohione (Ohio shrimp) is one of six species in this freshwater genus that is found throughout coastal rivers and their estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico and the southeastern Adantic Coast (Hedgpedi, 1949; Home and Beisser, 1977; Bowles et al, 2000). This shrimp is the only member of the genus that permanendy inhabits the Mississippi River System (MRS) (Taylor, 1992; Bowles et al, 2000; Barko and Hrabik, 2004). The distribution of M. ohione in the MRS historically ranged north to the Missouri River and well into the lower Ohio River. Prior to the 1940s, commercial fishermen reported large harvests of M. ohione, as part of a fishery for bait and human consumption, from as far north as Kentucky, Missouri and Illinois (McCormick, 1934; Hedgpeth, 1949; Taylor, 1992; Bowles et al, 2000). Since then, collections of M. ohione have become rare in the upper MRS, and when shrimps were taken from the northern reaches of the river, no gravid females were observed (Taylor, 1992; Conaway and Hrabik, 1997; Poly and Wetzel, 2002; Barko and Hrabik, 2004). Macrobrachium ohione has not been studied extensively within the MRS. A better understanding of this species' life history may provide insights into the decline of M. ohione populations along its northern distribution. Such information will be invaluable in the conservation of present populations and dieir restoration in the upper MRS.

Abbreviated or direct larval development has allowed most atyid and many palaemonid shrimp species to adapt to exclusive freshwater living (Hubschman and Broad, 1974; Jalihal et al, 1993; Bauer, 2004). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Female Downstream-Hatching Migration of the River Shrimp Macrobrachium Ohione in the Lower Mississippi River and the Atchafalaya River
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.