Teaching Students to Manage Behavior

By Little, Suzanne F. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, September 2011 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Teaching Students to Manage Behavior


Little, Suzanne F., National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


Teaching Students to Manage Behavior SCHOOL DISCIPLINE AND SELFDISCIPLINE: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO PROMOTING PROSOCIAL STUDENT BEHAVIOR By G. G. Bear 2010, Guilford

School Discipline and Self-Discipline: A Practical Guide to Promoting Prosocial Student Behavior can be a valuable tool for both school psychologists and classroom teachers. Bear, a recognized expert in the area, describes how to realistically have a well-managed classroom and teach students to manage their own behavior. This text, which is part of the Guilford Practical Intervention in the Schools Series, is that - practical. The first three chapters of the text thoroughly yet concisely describe the traditional goals of discipline: managing students and developing selfdiscipline in students. Specifically, the book discusses the use of school-wide positive behavior support and social and emotional learning to manage student behavior and promote student self-discipline. Bear candidly details the strengths and limitations of both approaches and highlights the utility of the approaches when used together. For example, school-wide positive behavior support is most effective in preventing and correcting behavior problems and is less successful in developing selfdiscipline in students. While social and emotional learning has strengths in developing the social and emotional competencies related to self-discipline and in preventing problem behaviors, it is less effective in correcting problem behaviors. This text gives practical Strategies implement the strengths of each program and describes the complementary nature of the two approaches.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Teaching Students to Manage Behavior
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?