The English Catholic Community, 1688-1745: Politics, Culture, and Ideology/Catholic Gentry in English Society: The Throckmortons of Coughton from Reformation to Emancipation/The Making and Unmaking of the English Catholic Intellectual Community, 1910-1950

By Walker, William T. | Anglican and Episcopal History, September 2011 | Go to article overview

The English Catholic Community, 1688-1745: Politics, Culture, and Ideology/Catholic Gentry in English Society: The Throckmortons of Coughton from Reformation to Emancipation/The Making and Unmaking of the English Catholic Intellectual Community, 1910-1950


Walker, William T., Anglican and Episcopal History


The English Catholic Community, 1688-1745: Politics, Culture, and ideology. By Gabriel Glickman. (Woodbridge, Suffolk, England: Boydell Press, 2009, Pp. ix, 306. $115.00.)

Catholic Gentry in English Society: The Throckmortons of Coughton from Reformation to Emancipation. Edited by Peter Marshall and Geoffrey Scott. (Farnham, Surrey, England: Ashgate, 2009, Pp. xvi, 282. $114.95.)

The Making and Unmaking of the English Catholic Intellectual Community, 1910-1950. By James R. Lothian. (Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009, Pp. xxiii, 487. $60.00.)

Scholarly interest in the Reformation and post-Reformation history of English Roman Catholicism continues unabated as evidenced by the publication of these three outstanding works which consider distinct topics and periods. The Catholic Record Society of the United Kingdom must be credited to a large extent for sustaining interest in English Catholicism and contributing to the development of another generation of scholars. Founded in 1904, the Catholic Record Society has developed through its annual three-day conferences, and the publication of itsjournal, Recusant History, a monograph series, and an outstanding series of volumes with printed primary materials (the CRS Records Series.) The Catholic Archives Society, founded in 1979, is another important organization that provides valuable resources for scholars who are involved in research on English Catholicism. Numerous journals, including Midlands Catholic History, Northern History, Chesterton Review, and the Downside Review have provided outlets for scholars active in this field.

In his masterful and useful study, The English Catholic Community, 1688-1745, Politics, Culture, and Ideology, Gabriel Glickman fills a gap in recent English Catholic historiography and advances a revisionist interpretation of the recusant community's response to the political developments associated with the Glorious Revolution, the war against France, and the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. Glickman argues that English Catholic households were successful in handling the challenges that they confronted during this fifty-seven year period and emerged as a more coherent political and religious force - indeed, a social elite - in English society. The Jacobite rebellion in 1745 aroused the fervor of the English Catholic gentry to restore a Catholic Stuart monarch; it did not attract the level of participation that seriously jeopardized the status quo. Care must be exercised in measuring national and religious identity; treatises, tracts, and transcripts of speeches may reflect a reality that is not supported by political or military actions. Glickman utilized a wide range of manuscript sources from a variety of depositories including the Archives of the Archbishop of Westminster, the British Library, Downside Abbey, the Archives of the English Province of the Society of Jesus, various Record Offices, and other sources. His bibliography, and his use of the materials in the text, clearly indicates that Glickman had a facile command of the current and past literature on English Catholicism during this era.

In Catholic Gentry in English Society: The Throckmortons of Coughton from Reformation to Emancipation, Peter Marshall and Geoffrey Scott have edited a volume of nine essays focused on the history of the Throckmortons of Coughton (Warwickshire) sustaining their Catholicism and their political, economic, and social position with English society from the early sixteenth to the second half of the nineteenth centuries. In the initial essay, "Introduction: The Catholic Gentry in English Society," Marshall and Scott present a valuable description of the precarious yet sustainable position and role of the Catholic gentry in English society; they were indeed correct when they wrote: "Early modern Catholic history has begun to come in from the cold" - in large part due the quality of scholars such as themselves. Marshall and Scott's "Introduction" places the issues which are to be discussed front and center.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The English Catholic Community, 1688-1745: Politics, Culture, and Ideology/Catholic Gentry in English Society: The Throckmortons of Coughton from Reformation to Emancipation/The Making and Unmaking of the English Catholic Intellectual Community, 1910-1950
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.