Industrial Research Institute's R&D Trends Forecast for 1998

By Wood, Robert | Research-Technology Management, January/February 1998 | Go to article overview

Industrial Research Institute's R&D Trends Forecast for 1998


Wood, Robert, Research-Technology Management


The outlook for industrial R&D in the United States continues to be positive, this 14th annual forecast reveals. Compare it with accompanying forecasts from IRI counterparts in Europe, Australia, Brazil, Japan, and Korea.

IRI's R&D trends forecast for 1998 indicates that the outlook for industrial R&D continues to be positive. Thirty-one percent of the respondents plan to increase their R&D expenditures by more than 5 percent in 1998. The overall projected increase in R&D budgets over 1997 by respondents is expected to be 4.8 percent.

IRI's forecast also indicates a continued high level of attention to R&D by top management of U.S. companies and a continuing strong commitment to cooperative research.

The 1998 forecast is based on replies from 129 IRI member companies. These companies expect an average R&D intensity (R&D as a percent of sales) of 3.1 percent, slightly lower than the 3.4 forecast for 1997 (which may reflect an anticipation of significant growth in sales for 1998).

This optimistic outlook is quite similar to last year's prediction for 1997. The graphs on page 18 illustrate the following details:

Eighty percent of the respondents expect their R&D expenditures to increase in 1998, with 31 percent anticipating increases of more than 5 percent. Last year, 29 percent of the respondents expected increases of more than 5 percent.

Consistent with these forecasts, 78 percent expect their capital spending for R&D to increase, with 26 percent anticipating increases of more than 5 percent and 22 percent expecting decreases (last year, 29 percent expected decreases).

Also consistent, 20 percent expect total R&D professional staffing to increase by more than 5 percent, while 26 percent will hire more new graduates (last year's forecasts were 15 and 17 percent, respectively). "Increases" in the following categories represent the percent of companies expecting increases greater than 5 percent.

About 14 percent expect to increase the amount of "directed basic" research (similar to last year's forecast of IS percent).

Increased grants for university R&D are planned by 21 percent (19 percent last year).

Increases in alliances and joint ventures are seen by 39 percent (same as last year).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Industrial Research Institute's R&D Trends Forecast for 1998
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.