RADICAL ISLAM IN AMERICA: Salafism's Journey from Arabia to the West

By Nguyen, Keith | Military Review, November/December 2011 | Go to article overview

RADICAL ISLAM IN AMERICA: Salafism's Journey from Arabia to the West


Nguyen, Keith, Military Review


RADICAL ISLAM IN AMERICA: Salafism's Journey from Arabia to the West, Christopher Heffelfinger, Potomac Books Inc., Dulles, VA, 2011, 135 pages, $29.95.

Sounding less like a scholar then an FBI agent on his third cup of coffee, Chris Heffelfinger in Radical Islam in America compiles too many names and numbers while barely scratching the surface of the sociopsychological complexities of Salafi Islam, the initially apolitical Salafi movement started by Muhammad Ibn Abd Al-Wahhab in Saudi Arabia.

Salafism calls for traditionalism as set forth by 13th-century Islamic scholars, and it calls for Muslims to return to Ahl al-Sunna wal-Jama'a. However, unrest ranging from anti- Colonialism sentiments in the 1800s to anti-Western hegemony sentiments in the 1990s divided Salafism into various sects. Dogmatic, albeit initially benign, scholarly discussions gave way to violent social activism meant to establish Sharia laws.

The author repeats one point nearly verbatim in almost every chapter: Salafism transcended international boundaries, fueled by a vast ever-growing pool of mismanaged petrodollars and a new common Muslim identity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

RADICAL ISLAM IN AMERICA: Salafism's Journey from Arabia to the West
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.