'How Many of You Are Using Electronic Health Records?'

By Grantham, Dennis | Behavioral Healthcare, November/December 2011 | Go to article overview

'How Many of You Are Using Electronic Health Records?'


Grantham, Dennis, Behavioral Healthcare


Technology adoption key to proving the value of treatment - and getting paid, says Clark

When H- Westley CIarki MDi JD, MPH, CAS1 FASAM, director of SAMHSAs Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, asked the question during his keynote presentation at che 201 1 National Conference on Addiction Disorders (NCAD), relatively few attendees were able to raise dieir hand.

During his presentation, "Does Health Information Technology Have a Place in Addiction Treatment?" Clark said diat too many treatment providers still haven't implemented EHRs - even though they "need to have the ability to document what they do."

"People want to know what they are getting," noted Clark. "Stories are not enough; we need data, a sense of quality. Otherwise, how are we supposed to learn that people are getting better?"

Clark discussed the need for better quality measures, suggesting that measures need to be in place to determine if the best decisions are being made to deliver patients the highest quality of care.

While Clark said the primary role of the HIT effort is "supporting behavioral health aspects of the EHRs based on standards in the system," he added that it also needs to be able to exchange the data and analyze quality in order to demonstrate its worth in respect to funding.

Clark also voiced die need to first create the infrastructure for interoperable EHRs, including privacy, confidentiality, and data standards.

"That is one of the underlying issues," he said. "We have increasing accessibility to EHRs, but it raises this issue of trust and confidentiality."

Policymakers to move on key IT concerns

In another NCAD session, Clark said that policy makers are also considering a variety of methods for electronically managing the patient consent process required by CFR 42, Part 2, the federal confidentiality statute that governs access to addiction treatment records. While the method to be used is not yet known, Clark asserted, "That can be done, and it will be done,"

Clark also indicated that decision makers have "no consensus yet" on the behavioral health content to be required in the proposed electronic "CCD," or continuity of care document, that has been proposed as part of an interoperable patient EHR. However, he pointed out that a meeting of policyrnakers, scheduled for January, will consider the issue.

As the federal government takes steps to advance the adoption and use of healthcare information technology, Clark said that providers must do the same or risk longer-term financial losses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'How Many of You Are Using Electronic Health Records?'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.