Serum Zinc Levels in Children and Adolescents with Type-1 Diabetes Mellitus

By Estakhri, M.; Djazayery, A. et al. | Iranian Journal of Public Health, October 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

Serum Zinc Levels in Children and Adolescents with Type-1 Diabetes Mellitus


Estakhri, M., Djazayery, A., Eshraghian, M. R., Majdzadeh, R., Jalali, M., Karamizadeh, Z., Chamari, M., Milani, M. Peyrovi, Iranian Journal of Public Health


Abstract

Background: There have been very few studies, with contradictory results, on the zinc status of children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine zinc status based on the serum zinc concentration in type-1 diabetic children and adolescents and compare it with that of healthy controls.

Methods: Thirty children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes mellitus, aged 6 to 18 years, and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Serum zinc, fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c and serum albumin were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, enzymatic colorimetry, ion-exchange chromatography and colorimetry using bromocresol green methods, respectively.

Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the mean serum zinc concentration between diabetic patients and healthy controls (111.0 ± 3.1 and 107.1 ± 3.8 mg/dl respectively, P= 0.4). No correlations were found between the serum zinc levels and fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, or the duration of the disease in the patients.

Conclusion: The zinc levels of diabetic children and adolescents are not noticeably different compared to those of healthy controls and are independent of glycemic control and the duration of the disease.

Keywords: Zinc, Type-1 diabetes mellitus, Children, Adolescents, Hemoglobin A1c

Introduction

Several studies have shown changes in zinc status and metabolism in both type-1 and type-2 diabetes mellitus patients (1-3). Some investigators have reported unusual urinary zinc excretion in both types (4-6) and, consequently, considered the possibility of its deficiency. However, zinc deficiency in diabetic patients has not been well demonstrated (7).Zinc is an essential trace element with a vital role in metabolism, particularly as a cofactor of many enzymes, required for natural metabolic processes, growth and development. Therefore, it is of great importance in childhood and adolescence (8, 9). Reports in the literature on the zinc status of children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are limited and contain contradictory results. Some investigators have shown decreased serum zinc concentrations (10, 11), while others have found elevated levels (12, 13), as compared to nondiabetic controls; a few have observed no changes (14, 15). No study has been reported to date on the zinc status of children and adolescents with T1DM in Iran, a large country greatly varied with regard to ethnic, genetic, environmental, ecological and dietary characteristics. The objective of this study was to determine zinc status based on the serum zinc concentration in children and adolescents with T1DM and compare it with that of healthy controls.

Materials and Methods

Study design

Thirty children and adolescents with T1DM (diagnosed by a pediatric endocrinologist), 6 to 18 years old (patient group), including 13 girls and 17 boys and 30 weight-, height-, body mass index-, age- and sex-matched healthy children (control group) participated in this crosssectional study. The patients were randomly selected from among those with active files in Namazi Medical Teaching Center, one of the main teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran. They had no other systemic disease and were taking no medication that would interact with zinc metabolism; they were taking only insulin. The controls were apparently healthy children taking no zinc supplement. None of the participants had taken vitamin and mineral supplements for at least 3 months before initiation of the study.

Measurements

Fasting blood samples were taken from all participants at 7:30 A.M. and analyzed for serum zinc, fasting blood sugar (FBS), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and serum albumin. Serum zinc, FBS, HbA1c and serum albumin were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, enzymatic colorimetry, ion-exchange chromatography and colorimetry using bromocresol green, respectively. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Serum Zinc Levels in Children and Adolescents with Type-1 Diabetes Mellitus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.