Essays in Honor of Christopher Hogwood: The Maestro's Direction

By Archbold, Lawrence | The American Organist, January 2012 | Go to article overview

Essays in Honor of Christopher Hogwood: The Maestro's Direction


Archbold, Lawrence, The American Organist


BOOKS

ESSAYS IN HONOR OF CHRISTOPHER HOGWOOD: THE MAESTRO'S DIRECTION, ed. Thomas Donahue. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 2011. 259 pp. ISBN 9780810877375. Few names in rhe world of early music are more widely known than that of Christopher Hogwood, who in 201 1 celebrates his 70th birthday. Honoring that occasion is this book of eleven essays, by as many autliors. (A brief afterword by Hogwood himself is also included.) With Hogwood's career as a conductor, harpsichord virtuoso, author, and recording artist so multifaceted, it comes as no surprise that the topics of these essays are likewise wide-ranging. They encompass biography, manuscript studies, performance practice, and analysis, with a special emphasis on organology.

Undoubtedly one of Hogwood's best-known recording projects is that of the complete Mozart piano concertos with soloist Robert Levin, and Levin here contributes "What Keyboard Instrument Did Mozart Envision for His Concerto in D Major, K. 175?" This is an essay that organisrs will find unexpectedly exciting, for Levin seeks to claim this work for the organ, suggesting that "performance on the organ provides the only consistent explanation of the issues of range in both right and left hands of the solo keyboard part" (p. 149). This closely argued essay would especially appeal to those with an interest in the details of the organs in Mozart's Salzburg.

In "Reading Soul from Manuscripts: Some Observations on Performance Issues in J. S. Bach's Habits of Writing His Music," Yo Tornita makes an argument for the idea that "There are cases in which variations in beaming appear to be deliberate, indicating articulation" (p. 19). Focusing on how eighth notes are beamed in the Well-Tempered CUvier, Vol. II, he finds both patterns that might be meaningful and inconsisrencies that undermine them.

Annette Richards turns to the next generation of the Bach family in "Picturing the Moment in Sound: C.P.E. Bach and the Musical Portrait." This essay explores connections between visual and musical portraiture in the second half of the 1 8th century in support of the idea that music "would seem to be the ideal medium for the portrayal of human subjects and their turbulent emotional constitutions" (p. …

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