The EBEA Website - What's Hot and What's Not

By Hancock, Margaret | Teaching Business & Economics, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

The EBEA Website - What's Hot and What's Not


Hancock, Margaret, Teaching Business & Economics


Statistics was never my strong point. All those words - binomial distribution, constant, control, correlation, dependent variable, degrees of freedom - and that's only a sprinkling from some of the first four letters of the alphabet. However, every month into my email in-box drop three sets of graphs and statistics which I do understand and which prove useful in our efforts to improve our members' experience - the statistics of pages and documents viewed and downloaded from the EBEA website.

I thought it might be interesting to share some of these with you and invite you to let us know your thoughts on how these match your own perceptions of the website. I don't plan on going into the technicalities of views, hits and visits. The more websawy amongst you will know the difference between those. For the purposes of this very cursory analysis I have gone for 'views' as being a useful set of statistics for identifying usage patterns. I have not included the statistics for the videos on EBEA TV. I will write about those at another time.

The viewing statistics I have looked at are for the period April-October 2011. During that time there was a total of 593,343 pages viewed. Not unsurprisingly the least active month was August, but those who complain of teachers' long holidays spent lying in the sun would be chastened to learn that even during your holidays you are working hard, seeking out resources for your planning and personal development, with 10 per cent of the six months' views recorded in August.

What is also surprising is the large number of people viewing the website between the hours of 1.00am and 6.00am. This could be dedicated UK students and teachers on all-night lesson preparation sessions. I imagine though it is more likely to be our overseas viewers. Greetings to our viewers in USA, Russia, China, Hong Kong, Canada, France, Netherlands, Sweden, Ireland, Germany, Jordan, Republic of Korea, Ukraine and a country I'd previously never heard of called Others'.

Are we meeting the needs of our members?

Looking at when pages were reached through search engines and the use of the search facility on the website itself, lesson evaluation is a popular search. However, way in front are those around BTEC and BTEC units. They took half of the top twenty-five places. We do have a good selection of resources for BTEC First and National and perhaps the searches reflect their reputation as the message spreads and more people seek them out. Or it might mean you keep looking in the hope of finding more. …

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The EBEA Website - What's Hot and What's Not
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