Aces High: The Heroic Saga of the Two Top-Scoring American Aces of World War II

By Mets, David R. | Air & Space Power Journal, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

Aces High: The Heroic Saga of the Two Top-Scoring American Aces of World War II


Mets, David R., Air & Space Power Journal


Aces High: The Heroic Saga of the Two Top-Scoring American Aces of World War II by Bill Yenne. Berkley Caliber (http://www .penguin.com), 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 1001 4-3657, 2009, 368 pages, $25.95 (hardcover), ISBN 978-0-425-21954-6.

Bill Yenne, a prolific writer, was born in 1949 and graduated from the University of Montana. The title of his book Aces High: The Heroic Saga of the Two Top-Scoring American Aces of World War II might suggest that he writes for the popular market, and the widely diverse books he has produced support that idea. This is not to suggest that Yenne's writing is weak and his grasp of air history imperfect. On the contrary, he writes quite well, only rarely making a historical error in the book under consideration. He has published works on Alexander the Great, the history of beer, and Sitting Bull, not to mention airpower subjects. The catalog of the academic library at Air University lists 17 of his books. Clearly, he must read at blazing speed and write briskly with good style. Nevertheless, I do not recommend that Aces High occupy a high place on the reading lists of Air and Space Power Journal's (ASPJ) audience.

Yenne tells an adventure story about P-38 pilots Richard Bong and Thomas McGuire- two leading American aces, both of them recipients of the Medal of Honor- who flew in the Southwest Pacific and died at age 25. The author injects some human interest into the story by discussing their personal lives in training as well as their wartime loves. Gen George Kenney, Douglas MacArthur's air commander, took a personal interest in both heroes; in fact, he wrote a biography of Bong after the war.

ASPJ readers will find that the book concentrates almost wholly on operational history at the tactical level, tending toward a sortie-bysortie description of the work of both pilots, set in a story of competition between the two for the title of America's leading ace.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Aces High: The Heroic Saga of the Two Top-Scoring American Aces of World War II
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.