Ten Years of Integrating Research and Practice Perspectives: A Guide to Sport Marketing Quarterly Case Studies

By Apostolopoulou, Artemisia | Sport Marketing Quarterly, December 2011 | Go to article overview

Ten Years of Integrating Research and Practice Perspectives: A Guide to Sport Marketing Quarterly Case Studies


Apostolopoulou, Artemisia, Sport Marketing Quarterly


Introduction

In September 2001, under the leadership of Editor Brian Crow (Slippery Rock University) and Associate Editor Cheri Bradish (Brock University), Sport Marketing Quarterly published its first case study. In its inception, the case study section was intended to publish "manuscripts ... with very little empirical data, but with meaningful and timely information" and to share "cutting-edge marketing with a theoretical base that is significant and applicable to many segments of the sport industry" (Crow, 2001, inside front cover). Consistent with the mission of the journal, the audience for this section was sport marketing/management academicians, industry professionals, and students. Since then, and up until September 2011, a total of 39 case studies of varying scope and emphasis have been published in SMQ. Beginning in September 2005, under Editor Jacquelyn Cuneen (Bowling Green State University) and Associate Editor James Gladden (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis), published case studies have been accompanied by teaching notes available on SMQ's website.

The purpose of the present report, prepared specifically for SMQ's anniversary issue, is twofold: First, to provide a useful tool for sport marketing instructors to navigate through the case studies published in the journal between 2001 and 2011. Second, to show the evolution of SMQ case studies through the years and to highlight the sport industry sectors represented and the sport marketing topics examined. It is my hope that this document will become a guide for sport marketing colleagues interested in incorporating case studies in their courses.

Ten Years of Case Studies

Table 1 includes a list of all SMQ case studies with full citation, keywords, and a summary of each case. The keywords, offered as a way to more easily sort through all published cases, identify the sector and geography of the organization under study, the specific area/theme of sport marketing explored, and key theoretical concepts examined in the case study.

The review of all case studies published in SMQ during the 2001-2011 period shows that:

* SMQ case studies have succeeded in covering a variety of topics ranging from sport sponsorship and branding to sport consumer behavior and sales. There are, however, certain areas within the sport marketing field that are underrepresented, including marketing aspects of place and price, licensing, technology and new media, and ethics.

* The organizations under study in the SMQ case studies operate in various sectors of the sport industry, such as professional sport (major and minor leagues), collegiate athletics, and sport events of various scope and size mainly from the United States/North America. To a lesser extent, international events and professional or amateur sport organizations from non-U.S. countries are the topic of study. More recently, there have been two cases examining issues facing international mega-events, specifically the 2010 Winter Olympic Games (19:2) and FIFA's 2014 World Cup (20:3) (see Table 1).

* There is variation in terms of the orientation and style of SMQ case studies. Specifically, some cases are merely descriptive; they present an issue facing a sport organization along with the way in which the issue was addressed by the organization (e.g., 10:4; 13:1; 14:2; 14:3; 17:1; 17:3; 18:2). In other instances, the case studies resemble more traditional manuscripts in that they share findings from empirical research without necessarily putting forth a specific problem facing a sport organization at a given time (e.g., 12:3; 13:2; 16:2; 18:3; 19:1). Recently, the journal has published more cases that present a main issue/problem and task the reader with finding solutions (e.g., 14:4; 15:2; 19:2; 19:3; 19:4; 20:1; 20:2; 20:3) (see Table 1).

* Similarly, there has been variation in the teaching notes submitted (available for cases published from September 2005 on). …

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