White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century

By Preston, James C. | Mankind Quarterly, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview
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White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century


Preston, James C., Mankind Quarterly


White Identity: Racial Consciousness in the 21st Century Jared Taylor American Renaissance, Oakton, Va. 2011

Jared Taylor is perhaps best known for his influential book Paved With Good Intentions (1992) which claimed that whites - not blacks - were now the primary victims of racial discrimination in the United States. His latest book, with the jolting title White Identity (2011), takes this line of argument further and shows how the sense of ethnic identity seems to be growing amongst non-white communities in the U.S.A, while declining amongst whites. He then discusses what life is like for white Americans in an increasingly non-white United States where integration has not taken place as universally as expected, and where white babies are already a minority of births.

The book opens with a discussion of governmentenforced attempt at racial integration in the USA. The author cites the leading race theorists of the 1960s, Thurgood Marshall, Robert Kennedy, Kenneth Clark and others, who thought complete integration of American schools would be achieved within a few years. But while school integration peaked in the 1980s, it is now back to where it was prior to Brown v. Board of Education. White percentages of public school students are in the single digits in many areas such as Atlanta, Los Angeles, Miami, Houston, Baltimore, Chicago, Washington D.C., Dallas and Detroit. Voluntary segregation persists and is not limited to education but also occurs in housing, churches and marriage.

Official emphasis is now devoted to idealizing the concept of "diversity," and this has is being promoted through affirmative action, multicultural education, bilingual education and other race-conscious policies. As a result, many large companies and universities now have "Diversity Officers," and employers such as Walmart select their vendors to insure racial diversity when awarding contracts. But while whites are often viewed as the impediment to true diversity, Taylor focuses on the reality of diversity in a multi-cultural America. In Los Angeles, perhaps the most diverse city in the United States, there is constant race conflict between blacks and Hispanics, with ethnically-segregated communities engaged in constant racially-charged brawls, attacks and murders, particularly in public schools and prisons.

Nor is it only blacks and Hispanics who don't seem to seek integration. There are ample examples of conflicts between and Asians, Blacks, Arabs and Hispanics, all around the United States, that challenge the assumption that "diversity is our greatest strength." In short, Taylor contends that instead of seeking integration, Hispanics, Asians, and blacks are growing more racially conscious in sharp contrast to the decline of racial consciouness amongst whites. His findings in this respect can be largely summed up in the following quote:

"Most non-whites take pride in their race and cultivate racial consciousness. They show solidarity for other members of their race, and do not hesitate to work for explicitly racial ends. Whites do the reverse: They condemn white racial pride and shun anyone who would work for explicitly white goals."

Some of the examples of black consciousness are relatively minor, such as blacks having marked differences from whites in things like the naming of babies, television viewing habits, political beliefs and the like. But even these are eye opening. For example a 2000 poll showed that only 13 percent of blacks thought O.J. Simpson was "probably guilty" while 73 percent believed "the CIA has imported cocaine for distribution in the black community."

Taylor cites numerous examples of diatribes by black politicians, actors, athletes and preachers against whites that pass without outrage. But most chilling are the racially motivated assaults, rapes, and murders of whites by blacks. To cite just one example from White Identity:

"In 2010, Theron Lacey was on trial in Dallas for stabbing a 67-year-old white woman to death and stealing her wallet and cell phone.

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