N. Korea Agrees to Nuclear Halt

By Crail, Peter | Arms Control Today, March 2012 | Go to article overview

N. Korea Agrees to Nuclear Halt


Crail, Peter, Arms Control Today


North Korea has agreed to suspend uranium enrichment and to implement moratoriums on nuclear and long-range missile tests, Department of State spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said in a Feb. 29 statement.

A North Korean Foreign Ministry statement carried by the state-run Korean Central News Agency the same day said Pyongyang agreed to the steps "with a view to maintaining [a] positive atmosphere" for high-level talks between the two countries, and that it would continue to refrain from such activities "while productive dialogues continue." The United States and its allies have called on North Korea to suspend enrichment, nuclear tests, and long-range missile tests as conditions for restarting multilateral talks on North Korea's nuclear weapons program.

The agreement comes on the heels of the first formal meeting between U.S. and North Korean officials since the death of long-time North Korean leader Kim Jong Il last December.

After the Feb. 23-24 meeting in Beijing, U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy Glyn Davies told reporters that the two sides "made a little bit of progress," calling North Korea's willingness to meet with the United States "relatively soon" after its leadership transition a positive development. Davies rejected the idea that the talks made a breakthrough, however. "I think the word breakthrough goes way too far," he told reporters.

Kim Jong Il's third son, Kim Jong Un, was formally declared the country's new leader Dec. 29.

According to Davies, the talks covered a wide range of issues, including nonproliferation, human rights, and food assistance. Nuland said in her Feb. 29 statement the United States is working with North Korea to provide 240,000 metric tons of food assistance under "intensive monitoring."

Davies pointed out that, despite North Korea's leadership change, his North Korean counterpart, Vice Foreign Minister Kim Gye Gwan, has been Pyongyang's lead nuclear negotiator for many years.

"He's one of the veterans of the sixparty process, and many of the officials on his side had been involved previously in these talks, so I didn't have sitting across the table from me a new cast or a new set of officials," Davies said. The meeting originally was scheduled to last for a single day, but the two countries extended it to a second day.

The U.S.-North Korean discussions were the third session since Pyongyang backed out of multilateral talks on its nuclear program in 2009. The two countries, as well as the other four participants in the so-called six-party talks-China, Japan, Russia, and South Korea-have called for a resumption of negotiations. …

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