China's Politics Remain Inscrutable

China Post, March 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

China's Politics Remain Inscrutable


Three decades after China's perestroika and glasnost, the country's politics have remained as inscrutable and opaque as ever. The erstwhile "bamboo curtain" seems still there, awaiting to be hoisted one day.

Few journalists or China watchers can honestly claim they have any credible information about what's going on behind the walls of "zhongnanhai." The best they can do is to stretch their imagination.

Remember what did the "experts" say after Mao Zedong died in 1976? They predicted the emergence of a "collective leadership." Nobody had imagined that a coup would bring down the "gang of four" headed by Mao's widow Jiang Qing. China's politics of smoke and mirrors have always been fascinating and perplexing.

Now it's "deja vu all over again" in Beijing where a bombshell exploded last month when Bo Xilai, a shining political star, fell from power suddenly. The news made international headlines because Bo was widely expected to enter China's all-powerful inner circle of leadership - the nine-man Standing Committee of Politburo - during a once-in-a-decade transition of power later this year.

Now, more than six weeks since Bo's dismissal from the post of Communist Party secretary in Chongqing, a megacity in Sichuan, the real reason of his firing has been shrouded in mystery. Rumors have been ripe: power struggle, conspiracy, vendetta, and all sorts of speculation including a coup in Beijing.

Many analysts see Bo's fall from power as the result of a seething struggle between two lines and two factions - Maoists and reformists. Bo Xilai, the charismatic and flamboyant politician, is labeled as a Maoist because he has been famous, now notorious, for his campaign to promote a retro Maoist culture by singing the "red songs" of Mao's revolutionary era. Bo's marquee policy of "smashing black" - a sweeping and relentless crackdown on organized crime, Robocop-style by Bo's police chief Wang Lijun, smacked of Mao's Great Cultural Revolution of lawlessness and persecution. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

China's Politics Remain Inscrutable
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.