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Medical Economics, February 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

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A summary of current clinical articles from that pile on your desk

CARDIOVASCULAR

Psoriasis may signal CHD risk

Am J Cardiol. Online before print. [January 3, 2012]

People with psoriasis are more vulnerable to coronary heart disease (CHD) than those without, and the risk is higher the longer the duration of psoriasis, according to researchers at the University of California Davis in Sacramento. They inspected the dermatology records of 9^473 patients who underwent coronary angiography and found that 204 had psoriasis before their angiography. Some 81.3% of patients with psoriasis had CHD compared with 75.7% without psoriasis. After adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, those with psoriasis were 80% more likely to have CHD, and those with psoriasis for more than 8 years had more than triple the risk of CHD compared with the patients without psoriasis.

Verdict is the same: PSA not a useful Screeningtest

JNCIJ Natl Cancer Inst. Online before print. [January 6, 2012]

Mass screening through blood prostate specific antigen testing (PSA) does not extend lives, according to an update of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial. The recently released 13-year results carry the same conclusion as the previously published 10-year results with respect to PSA screening. In the PLCO trial, 76,685 men aged 55 to 74 years were randomly assigned to 6 years of annual PSA testing and 4 years of digital rectal examinations or usual care (which could include opportunistic screening). Prostate cancer mortality was not different between the two groups at 13 years (3.7 versus 3.4 per 10,000 person-years in the screened group and usual care group, respectively), although prostate cancer was diagnosed significantly more often in the group screened routinely (incidence: 108.4 versus 97.1 per 10,000 personyears, respectively).

* Grief can increase MI risk acutely

Circulation. Online before print. [January 9, 2012]

The death of a loved one sharply increases a person's risk of a myocardial infarction (MI) in the immediate 24 hours following the death. The finding was derived from interviews of 1,985 patients conducted during their hospitalization for an MI. Some 270 (13.6%) reported the death of a significant person in their lives in the previous 6 months, including 19 who experienced such a loss within 1 day of their MI. The incidence rate of MI was elevated 21.1-fold within 24 hours of learning of the loss, compared with deaths that occurred at any time in the previous 6 months. During the first week, the risk of MI was still six times greater in those who had lost a significant person in their lives. …

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