Painting in an Era of Critical Theory

By Nadaner, Dan | Studies in Art Education, Winter 1998 | Go to article overview

Painting in an Era of Critical Theory


Nadaner, Dan, Studies in Art Education


What are the values of painting for the contemporary visual arts curriculum? One of the central tenets of critical theory holds that the value of art in conveying subjectivity has been superseded by the newer task of interrogating the nature of representation. In an art world dominated by critical theory and by new forms that speak to that theory, the contribution of painting to society and to education is not as firmly established as it was in the first half of the century. In this paper I review the challenge from critical theory to painting and cnstruct an aiternative relationship between the two fields. I attempt to reaffirm the relationship between painting and experience, and to articulate ways in ss-hich concepts in critical theory are informed and extended by the practice of painting. A constructive analysis of the relationship between critical theory and painting permits a positive reconception of the role of painting in a contemporary visual arts program.

Critical theory has rapidly become a center of attention and energy in the visual arts. By critical theory I mean the grouping of semiotic, structuralist, psychoanalytic, and postmodern theory that has taken a leading role in the direction of art criticism and contemporary art history.3 The writings of many critical theorists-e.g., Irigaray (1985), Jameson (1984), Lacan (1977), and Lyotard (1979)-have contributed to an awareness of the social context of artistic production, a focus on relations of power in works of art, and a mistrust of claims of authenticity and subjectivity in the modernist tradition. Since 1970 there has been a close relationship between developments in critical theory and the emergence of "new forms" in visual art, such as language-based and conceptual installations, that speak directly to that theory (Gottlieb, 1976; Harrison & Wood, 1993; Rorimer, 1989). Painting is discussed most often as an artifact of modernism, and therefore an object of dismissal rather than a medium of promise for speaking to contemporary issues (Baker, 1996; Crimp, 1981; Kuspit, 1996; Lawson, 1984; Rubinstein, 1997). If painting is not "dead," it is not very healthy within the critical climate of recent years.

Yet little rigorous analysis has actually been applied to the relationship between critical theory and painting. As new forms demand attention and funding, it is easy for painting to get lost in the excitement. At a time when changes are being considered in many visual art programs, it seems imperative that implications for change be reasoned and not assumed.

I will argue in this paper that there is a positive relationship between critical theory and the practice of painting. I will make this argument in three stages. First, I will review and critique the challenge from critical theory to painting. Second, I will set forth several concepts that are constructive points of contact between painting and critical theory. Third, I will use these concepts to create an alternative view of painting in an era of critical theory. I will suggest that painting continues to relate to experience and to education in specific and significant ways.

The Challenge From Critical Theory

One of the central arguments of critical theory holds that art is not a "figuration" (Jameson's term, quoted in Owens, 1982, p. 21) that is transparent to either the world or our experience of it. Following Lacan (1977), painting has lost its role both as a window to the world and as a window on experience. Both sides of the signifier/signified relationship are viewed as problematic. Communication through paint (the signifier) is problematic because the paint masks the word. Language is the form in which thought occurs. Signification based on language is arbitrary and socially contexted rather than authentic and universal. And the notion of an identifiable "experience" (the signified) is problematic, because that "experience" is also constructed by language as it used within a specific social positioning (Harrison & Wood, 1993, p. …

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