Roads to Rome: A Guide to Notable Converts from Britain and Ireland from the Reformation to the Present Day

By McCoog, Thomas M. | The Catholic Historical Review, April 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Roads to Rome: A Guide to Notable Converts from Britain and Ireland from the Reformation to the Present Day


McCoog, Thomas M., The Catholic Historical Review


Roads to Rome: A Guide to Notable Converts from Britain and Ireland from the Reformation to the Present Day. By John Beaumont. (South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press. 2010. Pp. xiii, 493. $55.00. ISBN 978-1-58731720-0.)

For Victorian Catholicism, the Catholic Emancipation of 1829 and the reestablishment of a Catholic hierarchy in 1850 restored national identity and respectability to believers villainized and marginalized for 300 years. John Henry Newman's rightly famous "Second Spring" sermon on July 13, 1853, heralded a new era that augured well for the Church's future in Great Britain. W. Gordon Gorman documented Catholic success in "Rome's Recruits": A List of Protestants Who Have Become Catholics since the Tractarian Movement (London, 1878). Subsequent editions were published, with the last appearing in 1910.

The rush of Protestants, especially English Anglicans, to the Church of Rome over the last three decades has occasioned the odd reference to a "third spring." If so, legal consultant and freelance writer John Beaumont assumes the Gorman role. Beaumont became a Roman Catholic in 1980, later compiling Converts to Rome: A Guide to Notable Converts from Britain and Ireland during the Twentieth Century (Port Huron, MI, 2006). Three works followed: Converts from Britain and Ireland in the Nineteenth Century (Port Huron, MI, 2007), Jewish Converts (Port Huron, MI, 2007), and Early Converts (Port Huron, MI, 2008). In his introduction to Converts to Rome, published as an appendix to this volume, Stanley L. Jaki, O.S.B., clearly connects the works of Beaumont and Gorman and considers the former as a revival of "a most praiseworthy enterprise which came to an end shortly before World War G (p. 473)- Perhaps it is slightly disingenuous of Beaumont not to acknowledge Gorman's work in his introduction. Without Gorman, Beaumont's task would have been much harder. Gorman, the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and the Catholic Encyclopedia (generally the old rather than the new edition) provide Beaumont with most of his biographical data, but Beaumont must have scoured numerous autobiographical works in his search for the motives behind the conversion.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Roads to Rome: A Guide to Notable Converts from Britain and Ireland from the Reformation to the Present Day
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?