A Word from WEI

By Valdivieso, Sybila | Women & Environments International Magazine, Fall/Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

A Word from WEI


Valdivieso, Sybila, Women & Environments International Magazine


This issue of WEI, on the topic of gender and food security deals withthe impact of the food crisis on women, particularly poor ruralwomen, women farmers and workers. The underlying issue iswomen's empowerment as well as economic models that per-petuate existing gender inequality and climate injustice.

As established in the discourse outlined in some of this issue's content, the concerns over gender and food security are far reaching. These issues and a host of related concerns are taking centre stage at the Rio+20 conference in Brazil in June 2012, a conference that is taking place 20 years after the landmark 1992 Earth Summit which established United Nations conventions to protect biodiversity and to tackle climate change.

WEI is a supporter and contributor to the Global Women's Submission for the Rio+20 conference in June 2012. The Global Women's Submission establishes food security and food sovereignty as priorities by referencing, among others, the following key points:

* Given that women constitute more than 50% of those who "go to bed hungry every night" (World Disasters Report on Hunger), food security systems need to address issues of equitable distribution of food, and need to address reasons behind crop failures, collapsing fish stocks and food price increases, including large-scale industrial bio-energy production.

* A review of the unfair legal framework for intellectual property in this field is needed to defend food security and food sovereignty, especially for women. …

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