Report of the Demand-Side Resources & Smart Grid Committee

Energy Law Journal, January 1, 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Report of the Demand-Side Resources & Smart Grid Committee


This report summarizes a selection of legislative and regulatory developments at the federal and state level in the areas of Smart Grid and demand-side resources during 2011.*

I. SMART GRID DEVELOPMENTS

A. Federal Activity

1. FERC and NIST Smart Grid Activity

In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an order1 finding that there was insufficient consensus to adopt standards to insure smart-grid functionality and interoperability in interstate transmission of electric power from among five "families" of standards under consideration.2 The FERC decided not to institute a rulemaking proceeding with respect to these standards and terminated the docket, Docket No. RM11-2-000.3 The five families of standards had previously been "identified as ready for consideration by regulatory authorities by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)"4 pursuant to the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).5

The EISA directs the FERC, once it is satisfied that the NIST's work has led to "sufficient consensus" on Smart Grid interoperability standards, to "institute a rulemaking proceeding to adopt such standards and protocols as may be necessary to insure smart-grid functionality and interoperability in interstate transmission of electric power, and regional and wholesale electricity markets."6 Relying upon "information gathered at technical conferences held on November 14, 2010 and January 31, 2011 in [Docket No. RM11-2-000] and on responses to the Supplemental Notice Requesting Comments issued February 16, 2011 (Supplemental Notice) seeking additional information on [S]mart [G]rid interoperability standards and the standards development process,"7 the FERC determined that sufficient consensus was lacking to allow such a rulemaking on the standards.8 The FERC "encourage[d] utilities, [S]mart [G]rid product manufacturers, regulators, and other [S]mart [G]rid stakeholders to actively participate in the NIST interoperability framework process,"9 "including the work of the [NIST's Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP)] and its committees and working groups," finding it to be "the best vehicle for developing [S]mart [G]rid interoperability standards."10

In October 2011, the NIST released a NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability Standards, Release 2.0, "detail[ing] progress made in Phases II and III of the NIST's three-phase plan since the establishment of the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP) in November 2009."11 Among the report's contents were a description of existing standards and emerging specifications applicable to the Smart Grid,12 including twenty-two new standards, specifications, and guidelines in addition to the seventy-five the NIST had recommended as immediately applicable to the Smart Grid in the first Roadmap.13 A new chapter, Framework for Smart Grid Interoperability Testing and Certification, provides details on an assessment of existing Smart Grid standards testing programs and offers high-level guidance for the development of a testing and certification framework.14

2. New NAESB Standards

Coordinated with the NIST effort to develop interoperability standards in response to the EISA were standards developed by the North American Energy Standards Board (NAESB). The NAESB created two additional interoperability standards in 2011 to complement the suite of NAESB Smart Grid work products. With the support of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), the NAESB developed the Third Party Access to Smart Meter-Based Information standard, which provides voluntary model business practices for the disclosure of smart meter-based information to third party service providers and the privacy practices that should be employed by those third party service providers and the distribution companies disseminating such information.15 The standard was finalized on August 8, 2011 and was referenced in the Smart Grid Principles resolution adopted by several standing Committees of NARUC as "a good reference point when developing such rules.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Report of the Demand-Side Resources & Smart Grid Committee
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?