Schoolchildren Rate Their Teachers

By Vorsino, Mary | Honolulu Star - Advertiser, June 4, 2012 | Go to article overview

Schoolchildren Rate Their Teachers


Vorsino, Mary, Honolulu Star - Advertiser


Public school students as young as 5 are being asked to consider their classroom experiences in surveys that will soon become one of the high-stakes measures used to evaluate teachers.

The surveys - part of a pilot program - were administered to students in kindergarten through 12th grade for the first time in March in 18 schools and will be given in 82 schools next school year, potentially multiple times.

The Department of Education declined to release results from the March surveys, saying the data are still being analyzed.

While some educators worry the surveys will reflect poorly on teachers who are strict or tough, the surveys' developers say the questionnaires are research-based and have been found to be highly linked to teacher effectiveness.

"We're asking students about what they're experiencing in the classroom. They're not popularity questions," said Rob Ramsdell, director of the Tripod Proj­ect, which creates the surveys for dozens of school districts.

"We have a lot of reason to believe that kids take it seriously and that the information we're getting is valuable," he said.

While a number of school districts use surveys to improve teaching, just one - Memphis, Tenn. - takes them into consideration when formally evaluating teachers. A handful of others are preparing to do so, including Georgia, which recently launched a pilot program similar to Hawaii's.

Yvonne Lau, administrator of the state Department of Education's performance management section, said the student surveys are aimed at "better identifying what is happening from the student perspective."

Administering the surveys in the school year that just ended cost about $100,000. That figure included technical support, rollout assistance and online access to results. The price tag for next school year has not been finalized.

Alex Harris, portfolio manager for the DOE's strategic reform office, said the surveys allow teachers and schools to hear the "student voice" at a time when there is a considerable push to turn the classroom into a learning community and a place for "two-directional engagement."

"These particular student questions are very predictive of teacher and student performance," he said, adding that it would be difficult for students to manipulate the survey. The questions, he said, are not about whether students like or dislike a teacher, but about the environment in a particular classroom.

Students in kindergarten through second grade get a proctored, simplified survey, and are asked to weigh in with a "yes," "no," or "maybe" on such statements as, "My teacher is very good at explaining things."

Older students are asked to indicate on a five-point scale (totally untrue to totally true) whether they agree with statements like, "My teacher doesn't let people give up when the work gets hard.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Schoolchildren Rate Their Teachers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.