2012 ASA Awards Program Honors Exemplars in the Held of Aging

Aging Today, May/June 2012 | Go to article overview

2012 ASA Awards Program Honors Exemplars in the Held of Aging


Each year, ASA honors individuals and organizations with its longstanding awards program, which includes the ASA Award, the ASA Hall of Fame Award, the Gloria Cavanaugh Award for Excellence in Training and Education, the Graduate Student Research Award, the Award for Excellence in Multicultural Aging and the Mental Health and Aging Network Award.

ASA Board member Tobi Abramson, who is the ASA Awards Committee chair and director of the Center for Gerontology and Geriatrics at New York Institute of Technology, says, "We work very hard to find exceptional people [and programs], and the awards are a great vehicle for highlighting and acknowledging the dedication and hard work people have done on the behalf of older adults."

A Practical Advocate for Aging

The ASA Award, given to someone who has made an outstanding contribution to aging-related research, administration or advocacy, goes this year to psychologist Erlene Rosowsky, who is an assistant clinical professor in psychology at Harvard Medical School. Rosowsky also is a core faculty member at the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology where she chairs the Center for Mental Health and Aging. She has been a member of ASA's Mental Health and Aging Network (MHAN) Council since its inception in 1994, and chairs the Generations Editorial Advisory Committee.

Rosowsky has a national reputation as an educator, scholar and practitioner, and one of her key contributions, according to Abramson, is applying practical evidence in her work with older adults and families. Rosowsky works consistently to bring great visibility to issues in aging, effectively balancing her clinical, professional and advocacy roles.

A Philosopher, Writer and Lifetime Aging Advocate

The ASA Hall of Fame Award recognizes an ASA member who enhances the lives of older adults through a lifetime of advocacy and leadership. This year, the award goes to the aging industry's philosopher, Harry "Rick" Moody. A multifaceted leader who is a teacher, prolific writer, editor and ethicist, Moody has helped to define the field of aging through more than 100 articles and book chapters, as well as in the books he has authored, which range from gerontology textbooks to more general nonfiction titles on spirituality.

Moody headed the Brookdale Center at Hunter College and is now director of Academic Affairs for AARP. He is a forward thinker and, says Abramson, a "key mover and shaker in the positive aging movement" who consistently and enthusiastically supports students and professors in aging.

Easter Seals Helps Older Adults Get Back to Work

Easter Seals wins the Gloria Cavanaugh Award, which honors an ASA member who demonstrates continued excellence in training and education in the field of aging. While Easter Seals is often recognized as an organization geared toward serving kids with disabilities, it is also involved in working with adult onset disabilities, especially in educational forums.

A leader in serving on long-term-care task forces and work groups, as well as in training elders to enter or re-enter the workforce, Easter Seals is dedicated to training older adults with emotional disabilities to get back to work. …

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