Chronology - Sudan

The Middle East Journal, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

Chronology - Sudan


Oct. 29: South Sudan Liberation Army (SSLA) rebels loyal to Matthew Pul Jang and other commanders attacked a town in Mayom, in the west of oil-producing Unity State, killing 15 and wounded 18. Two days prior, they had accused the Unity State government of human rights abuses and stealing cattle. Though a spokesman said that the army regained control of Mayom, the rebels claimed that they captured it and advanced on the towns of Tomor and Bentiu. More than 3,000 had died in rebel and tribal violence in Sudan in 2011. [Reuters, 10/29]

Oct. 30: A worsening economic crisis, high inflation, and rising food prices caused a rare protest of hundreds of students in the city of Kassala in eastern Sudan. Students in Kassala had initially protested for better study conditions two weeks prior. [Reuters, 10/30]

Nov. 3: After two months of heavy fighting, the Sudanese army captured the rebel stronghold of Kurmuk in Blue Nile State, near the Sudanese border, and expelled insurgents. A spokesman for Sudan People's Liberation Movement - North (SPLM-N) in Blue Nile said that the group withdrew from Kurmuk for strategic reasons but would not give up the fight. [AJE, 11/3]

Nov. 10: A refugee camp in South Sudan's Unity State was bombed, and state governor Taban Deng blamed Khartoum for the airstrikes. Yida camp held about 20,000 refugees from the conflict-ridden Sudanese provinces of South Kordofan and Blue Nile. At least two bombs fell and the number of casualties was not immediately known; a correspondent saw a crater about two meters wide, an unexploded bomb embedded into a school building, and a plane flying overhead. Both the US and the UN condemned the attack, though Khartoum denied responsibility while also announcing fresh clashes in South Kordofan. [AJE, Reuters, 11/11]

Nov. 11: The US-based Satellite Sentinel Project announced that Sudan was upgrading two air bases in Blue Nile state, raising concerns that Sudan would step up airstrikes against rebels around the poorly-defined border. The group also said it had received reports that Sudan launched airstrikes on refugee camps in Gufta, in South Sudan's Upper Nile state, killing seven. Sudan's Foreign Ministry dismissed the report as an attempt to stir up international sympathy for the rebels. [Reuters, 11/11]

Nov. 12: In a statement sent to Reuters, rebels in Darfur and the conflict-ridden border states of Blue Nile and South Kordofan announced that they had formed an alliance, called the Sudanese Revolutionary Front, to overthrow President Bashir's government and replace it with a democratic one. The rebels said that they would coordinate future military action. While the alliance did not pose an immediate military threat, analysts believed it could dash hopes of a political solution to the fighting. [AJE, 11/13]

Dec. 2: The International Criminal Court (ICC) requested an arrest warrant for Sudanese Defense Minister Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein as part of an investigation into atrocities in Darfur. A close ally of President Bashir, Hussein was responsible for the ongoing campaigns in Blue Nile and South Kordofan. He was wanted for war crimes committed between August 2003 and March 2004. [Reuters, 12/2]

Dec. 8: The National Congress Party, Sudan's ruling party, announced the formation of a new cabinet which would include members from 12 opposition parties. Nonetheless, top posts in defense, oil, and key government positions remained tied to the National Congress Party.

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