Factors Influencing Job Choice among Agricultural Economics Professionals

By McGraw, Katherine; Popp, Jennie S. et al. | Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, May 2012 | Go to article overview

Factors Influencing Job Choice among Agricultural Economics Professionals


McGraw, Katherine, Popp, Jennie S., Dixon, Bruce L., Newton, Doris J., Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics


This article identifies factors that influence agricultural economics professionals' job choice between academic and government employment. Respondents agreed that job responsibilities were the most important factor in choosing their current position. They also agreed that having a positive work environment, good salary, family time, adequate resources, and professional and social interaction were important job attributes. Proportionally more women than men regarded partner opportunities, nondiscrimination, time for child care, and supportive colleagues as very important attributes influencing their decisions. A binomial probit of respondents' current job sector indicates significant job choice determinants include sector preference (academic or government), previous professional experience, a positive work environment, and advancement opportunities.

Key Words: academic and government agricultural economics professionals, binomial probit, job choice, job preferences, gender

JEL Classifications: C25, J24, J43, J45

Each year many new agricultural economics graduates enter the job market. Choosing a position in the agricultural economics field is not unlike the search process in other disciplines (Butler, Sanders, and Whitecotton, 2000; University of Iowa College of Education, 2011). Upon graduation, these new professionals choose positions based on their goals, skills and experience (human capital), position availability, and job attribute preferences (e.g., opportunities for advancement, location, time for family, salary). Job choice studies seek to identify sets of factors that explain one career choice over another and determine respondents' job preferences, reasons for choosing one's current position, and factors that attract employees who are good matches for different work environments. For agricultural economics professionals, there are five clear sectors in which demand occurs: academia, government, business, international, and consulting (Schneider, 1985). This study analyzes survey responses from agricultural economics professionals working in the academic and federal government sectors.

Both employers and employees benefit from job choice studies. Identifying attractive qualities of positions and determining applicants' characteristics and preferences creates a more transparent environment in which candidates and employers can make well-informed decisions to foster job satisfaction, performance, and career longevity. This study seeks to identify factors influencing job choice, specifically among agricultural economics professionals. Most job choice information in the agricultural economics field is becoming dated with primary sources at least 10 years old and some up to 25 years old (Cheney, 2000; Schneider, 1985). Much of the existing information on agricultural economics professionals' job choices was obtained from topics addressed in salary studies (Barkley, Stock, and Sylvius, 1999; Broder and Deprey, 1985; Popp et al., 2010). The existing studies have examined working agricultural economics professionals (Marchant and Zepeda, 1995; Thilmany, 2000), but analyses have been descriptive as opposed to modeling choice behavior. Furthermore, many studies of agricultural economics professionals have only analyzed respondents from the academic sector with a special emphasis on the relationship between gender and salary (Abdula, 2008; Thilmany, 2000). Although Hiñe and Cheney (2000) focused on job choices of agricultural economics professionals and presented descriptive statistics by gender and ethnicity, no analyses were presented.

The current study seeks to address gaps in the relevant topics of job choice among agricultural economics professionals and choice behavior analysis as opposed to description. The study is novel for two reasons: 1) it identifies factors influencing the choice between a position in either academia or government with a probit model; and 2) it includes sample data for both new professionals in their first professional positions and seasoned professionals who, in many cases, are currently employed in positions other than their first professional positions after matriculation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Factors Influencing Job Choice among Agricultural Economics Professionals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.