The 2012 Genetics Society of America Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education: David A. Micklos

By Connelly, Tracey DePellegrin; Banerjee, Utpal | Genetics, June 2012 | Go to article overview

The 2012 Genetics Society of America Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education: David A. Micklos


Connelly, Tracey DePellegrin, Banerjee, Utpal, Genetics


EACH year, the Genetics Society of America honors an individual who has made significant and sustained contributions in the field of genetics education. In recognition of his extensive contributions to genetics education, and for bringing a genomics curriculum to a broad audience that includes K-12 to community colleges, large state institutions, small liberal arts colleges, and the lay public, David Micklos is this year's recipient of the Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education.

Through his work as founder and executive director of the DNA Learning Center (DNALC) at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), Dave has ushered DNA science into the educational curriculum for thousands of students, high school teachers, and undergraduate faculty. The DNALC's website alone hosts more than 7 million visitors each year (http://www.dnalc.org).

Sally C. R. Elgin, Viktor Hamburger Professor of Biology, Genetics, and Education atWashington University in St. Louis, Howard Hughes Medical Institute professor, and recipient of the 2009 Genetics Society of America Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellent in Education, describes Micklos's achievements in this way:

Dave's impact is based on three factors: the high quality of the genetics materials he has generated and supervised, judged both by scientific accuracy and clarity of communication; his ability to take the newest research tools and adapt them for student-centered investigations; and his ability to garner the funds to take his programs to large number of students, in New York, across the United States, and indeed worldwide.

Dave brings to the field a combination of education, experience, and talent, all wrapped in vision and pragmatism. His early career roles have ranged from biology teacher for the Baltimore City Public Schools to science teacher at Moeng College in Botswana while serving in the Peace Corps to Seasonal Park Ranger and Naturalist in the Maryland and the National Park Service. He has written numerous articles and several scientific textbooks, including "Making the American Public DNA Literate" and "Genetic Testing: An Educational Imperative to Our Schools," and his most recent textbook co-authored with Bruce Nash and Uwe Hilgert, Genome Science: A Theoretical and Practical Introduction to Gene Analysis in Eukaryotes.

Dave has served as executive director of the DNALC since 1988, having arrived at CSHL in 1982 to start the laboratory's public affairs and development efforts.

"I do not know anyone who has made more significant contributions in bringing the excitement of genetics and genomics to a wide audience that includes both high school and undergraduate students and teachers," says Sue Wessler, distinguished Professor of Genetics at the University of California, Riverside, and HHMI Professor, who has collaborated with Micklos as part of the National Science Foundation-funded iPlant Collaborative (http://www.iplant collaborative.org/). "Dave has a genius for deconstructing experimental concepts in genetics and genomics and for building tools and classroom experiences that both enrich and motivate students."

Of Cold Springs and Chances

When asked at what age he became interested in science, Dave displays characteristic, self-effacing candor. "I was not," he says, with emphasis, "interested in science in high school. In fact, in junior high, I remember sitting in the back row of the lab, playing cards or fooling around with the alcohol burner." "I slept through a lot of my chemistry course," he adds. "I liked to watch the late show and was tired by that period."

An advanced biology course in college taught by an interesting, charismatic professor sparked a long-running love of science for Dave, then an elementary education major. With a graduate degree in journalism in 1982, and working at a top New York City firm conducting sociological research, Dave was an unlikely candidate for the position as head of public affairs and development for the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The 2012 Genetics Society of America Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education: David A. Micklos
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.