Faith Thrives in Chinese Community

By Girard, Cheryl | Winnipeg Free Press, July 28, 2012 | Go to article overview

Faith Thrives in Chinese Community


Girard, Cheryl, Winnipeg Free Press


Christians, Buddhists among city believers

Though tiny, Winnipeg's Chinatown thrived as a community in the early 1900s. Crowded grocery stores and laundromats displaying colourful red-and-white signs dotted the area around King Street downtown.

By 1920, there were 900 Chinese people in the city running 150 laundries, three restaurants and eight grocery stores, says Paul Yee, author of Chinatown. One Chinese Mission stood alone on Logan Avenue.

The 2006 census lists 12,660 Chinese people living in Winnipeg, many of them highly educated and most preferring to live in the rapidly growing area near the University of Manitoba. Today there are at least six Chinese Christian churches in the city, as well as a number of Buddhist temples.

The largest of the Chinese churches is the Winnipeg Chinese Alliance Church at 261 Colony St.

Founded in 1967, the WCAC "is the biggest in attendance and in building and in every way. It is one church of three congregations," says Pastor Deyi Wei.

Wei estimates there are about 110 Cantonese-, 100 Mandarin- and 80 English-speaking members at the WCAC. Mandarin is used mostly in mainland China and Cantonese is the language of Hong Kong and parts of Southeast Asia, so both languages are offered. English is offered for the children.

The church grew out of a Chinese Christian fellowship group that met at the U of M in the early 1960s. As the congregation grew, it was forced to seek larger premises several times until it finally settled into the building on Colony in 1982.

The 54-year-old Wei was born in China but came to Winnipeg in 2002 from the United States, where he did his seminary studies. "China is experiencing enormous growth in churches. There are estimates of about 80 million to 100 million Christians in China now," he says.

The WCAC is active, helping out at Agape Table, the Union Gospel Church and Youth for Christ. "One family donated a house to reach out to local women involved in prostitution so that they have a safe place to stay," Wei says.

While the congregation is mostly Chinese, the English ministry led by Joel Black is attempting to reach out to the local community, newcomers and people of different backgrounds. The growing congregation also includes a children's pastor.

One of the city's newer Chinese churches is the Winnipeg Chinese Lutheran Church of South Winnipeg. Founded in 1992, the church operates at the Epiphany Lutheran Church at 200 Dalhousie Dr.

It was founded 20 years ago when Francis Tung, a Chinese pastor from Hong Kong, envisioned starting a church in the south end, says Kai Cheng, chairman of the church council.

About 50 to 70 members and usually 10 to 15 non-members attend, says Cheng, an engineer who came to Winnipeg from Hong Kong more than 40 years ago.

"A lot of students come because of the location of the church, being close to the U of M," says Helen Wang, who Cheng describes as a very involved member. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Faith Thrives in Chinese Community
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.