In a Champagne Mood

By Tyrrell, R. Emmett, Jr. | The American Spectator, November/December 2002 | Go to article overview

In a Champagne Mood


Tyrrell, R. Emmett, Jr., The American Spectator


--WASHINGTON--

All right, so my sanguine commentary on Campaign 2002 has been proved wrong. "My hunch," I mistakenly wrote two weeks before Election Day, "is that enough seats will actually go to the Republicans to give them a one-seat majority in the Senate." My mistake-Republicans now have a two-seat Senate majority, and possibly will pick up another in Louisiana's December runoff. So here I am before you, eating humble pie; but I am washing it down with champagne, Pol Roger.

After all, I was right in predicting that President George W. Bush would gain congressional seats. In the past one hundred years the White House's triumph from incumbency has been replicated only three times. All television's gabbing heads the weekend before the election entered into a dirge, predicting Republican losses and a Democratic majority in the Senate. Only Larry Kudlow, writing in the Washington Times (the Good Times), shared my optimism-hats off, Larry.

I think I was also right in October when I laid down my reasons for a forthcoming Bush victory. Various ominous events have put the American voter in a vigilant mood. We suffered a vile terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. It reminded the citizenry of prior attacks Americans suffered beyond our shores in the 1990s, attacks that the government treated lightly. Saddam's truculence, North Korea's cavalier rebuilding of its nuclear weapons program, and the brutal Washington sniper attacks intensified Americans' growing sense of vigilance. On Election Day they put their trust in a president who has demonstrated the will to more than "wag the dog."

Equally consequential in Campaign 2002 was the president's gentlemanly tone. He really was serious when he came to Washington promising to "change the tone," and the American people favor the change. As Robert L. Bartley, editor of the Wall Street Journal, remarked apres the vote, "The big story is that voters have in a big way repudiated the McAuliffe-Carville-- Clinton smash-mouth politics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In a Champagne Mood
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.