Garden of Eatin'

By Sanders, Carol | Winnipeg Free Press, August 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Garden of Eatin'


Sanders, Carol, Winnipeg Free Press


Couple's backyard is overflowing with the fruits -- and veggies -- of their labour

When the Garofalos bought a home in Crestview in the late '70s, their yard wasn't a feast for the eyes.

"When I came here there was a big lot," said Raffaele Garofalo.

More than 30 years later, every spare inch of the Italian-Canadian Winnipegger's backyard is growing something good to eat.

"It's heaven," said the retired chef who immigrated from Italy nearly 60 years ago.

These days, Garofalo is catering to hundreds of plants hung with huge zucchinis, tomatoes, peppers, beans and grapes. Thickets of oregano and basil ring the yard.

The side of his house next to the neighbour's is packed with more tomatoes. In the spring, Garofalo takes advantage of that narrow strip's southern exposure to start his plants from seed. He's designed a greenhouse using sheets of glass and Styrofoam and starts 200 to 300 plants.

Garofalo started off small in 1979, growing some Swiss chard and beets, learning as he went.

"I know a little bit from the old country," said Garofalo, who hails from Avellino near Naples. "We had a little bit of land."

His wife, Silvia, came from a farm in Abruzzi near Rome in 1954. They grew grain, corn, beans, potatoes and "things you could preserve for the winter." Money was tight, said Silvia, who grew up with seven siblings.

"We didn't have a store close by. Walking, it would take half a day to get to town."

She came to Canada for a better life. At a wrestling match in Winnipeg, mutual friends introduced her to Raffaele.

He'd come to Canada in 1953 at the age of 20 with no knowledge of English -- just $54 and some French he'd learned slaving away in coal mines in Belgium.

In Winnipeg, he got a job at CP Rail making 56 cents an hour.

Today, the Garofalos are both retired with great-grandkids.

They share a love for gardening, from spring planting to summer weeding and preserving the produce in the fall -- or sooner. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Garden of Eatin'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.