A Look at Wartime through the Eyes of Churchill's Daughter

Winnipeg Free Press, August 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

A Look at Wartime through the Eyes of Churchill's Daughter


THIS memoir should come with a tea cosy.

At 89, Mary Soames is the youngest and last surviving child of British prime minister Winston Churchill and his wife Clementine. Soames has made extensive use of diaries, research and her circle of friends and influence to give a detailed account of her Second World War experiences. That includes the civilian and the military.

Soames was only 17 when war was declared in September 1939, while her father, soon to be elected PM, was 64. His career was seemingly over, and his speeches against appeasement and in favour of Britain re-arming had been met with either stony silence or outright hostility.

She offers a loving and pugnacious daughter's perspective on the great man and his battles, with never a hint of doubt.

Keeping in mind her youth at the time, she expresses her emotions without reservation.

The early part of the book describes home life before the war, including the purchase of the family home Chartwell, which Churchill acquired in 1922 on a whim. This was done without consulting his wife, Clementine, and produced a rare tiff.

Even now a visit gives a feel of Churchill at ease, what with some brickwork he did himself and rooms that leave the visitor with the feeling that he has just stepped out. Soames' book produces the same feeling.

Considering her position of privilege, Soames comes across as young for her years. But accompanying her father on some of his political rounds and the coming of the war provided her with an early maturity in some respects.

As to affairs of the heart, she seems to have had a crush on someone new every few weeks. She's quite willing to provide the diary entries to describe the swooning and mooning.

Viewers of Downton Abbey won't be disappointed. She describes the customs, costumes and comestibles of the 1930s and '40s in some detail befitting a young lady of fashion.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Look at Wartime through the Eyes of Churchill's Daughter
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.