Summer Send-Off

By Martin, Melissa | Winnipeg Free Press, August 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Summer Send-Off


Martin, Melissa, Winnipeg Free Press


Get out this weekend and enjoy what's left of the season with these mostly no-cost suggestions

The days are shorter, the wind is crisp, and the calendar doesn't lie.

As the curtain looks to fall on the summer of 2012, some Winnipeggers' hearts may be inclined to despair. It's almost time to pack up the cabin, tune up the furnace and send the kids back to school. More bad news: there probably won't be any hockey this fall, which, after a winter of Winnipeg Jets, suddenly seems bleak.

But here's a little seasonal cheer: there is a full slate of events to send off the summer, whether families head down the block or clear down the highway. So now, in the final weekend of August, we offer a sample of just some of the events taking place around Manitoba this weekend, from corn cobs and cider to pioneer games and outdoor picnics.

MATLOCK FESTIVAL OF MUSIC, ART AND NATURE

Saturday and Sunday

Matlock, about 45 minutes north of Winnipeg on Hwy 9

For two blissful days, a 45-acre site near the shores of Lake Winnipeg will play host to any folks that need a little extra rest and relaxation.

Now in its third year, the non-profit festival offers a little something for everyone. Tonight, a birdwatching workshop will take attendees around the pristine natural site; last year, birders spotted 25 different species. On Sunday morning, there will be a special writing workshop. And that's just the beginning: throughout the weekend, visitors can take in yoga classes and crafting workshops, go swimming, rent a kayak, tackle the steps of Brazilian capoeira or just lie back and listen to music.

Seriously, there's going to be lots and lots of music: bluegrass mostly, and folk, from emerging young artists to successful Manitoba music acts such as the Doug and Jess Band. While you're listening (or playing -- organizers encourage folks to bring their own instruments), you can browse the festival's very eco-friendly marketplace and nosh on food from the Flying Bison Cafe.

A weekend pass is $25, and day passes are $15. Camping spots are also available for $5 per person, and there will be spots set up for campers to break out the guitars and jam. More information and a full schedule of events is online at Matlockfestival.ca.

MORDEN CORN AND APPLE FESTIVAL

Saturday and Sunday

Morden, about 90 minutes south of Winnipeg

The fun got started on Friday, but there's still loads of life left in one of southern Manitoba's hottest family festivals.

Founded in 1967, the Corn and Apple Festival has plenty of both foodstuffs to offer, including fresh apple cider and free buttered sweet corn, grown just for the event by a Morden-area farm. While you're munching, you can check out the rest of the festival, which spans a big chunk of the town: besides buskers, a farmer's market and a midway, there will also be a children's tent with face-painting and a petting zoo set up down the streets.

That's just the beginning. Throughout the day, festivalgoers can join a fossil digging tour, take a historical bus tour of Morden, do a little country line-dancin' and check out a truck and tractor pull. On Sunday, Confederation Park will light the grills for a community barbecue, and classic cars will be on display all weekend at the popular Show'n'Shine.

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