Lilly Drug May Slow Alzheimer's, but Experts Advise Caution

By Murphy, Tom | Winnipeg Free Press, August 25, 2012 | Go to article overview
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Lilly Drug May Slow Alzheimer's, but Experts Advise Caution


Murphy, Tom, Winnipeg Free Press


INDIANAPOLIS -- An Alzheimer's treatment from Eli Lilly and Co. failed to slow memory decline in two separate patient studies, but the drug did show some potential to help in mild cases of the mind-robbing condition that is notoriously difficult to treat.

The Indianapolis drugmaker's announcement could be a step toward a long-awaited breakthrough in the fight against the disease. But researchers not tied to the studies -- and Eli Lilly itself -- cautioned against overreacting to the initial results.

Lilly said Friday its treatment, solanezumab, failed to slow the rate of cognitive decline, which involves a person's ability to remember things, in two late-stage studies of about 1,000 patients each. But when data from the trials were combined, scientists saw a statistically significant slowing of that rate in the bigger population.

They also saw a statistically significant result when they examined a subgroup of patients with mild cases of Alzheimer's disease. The studies focused on patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's cases.

Lilly officials would not discuss details of the results and said they plan to talk with regulators about the next steps for the drug, which has yet to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. Full results from the studies will be presented at two scientific conferences in October. It's unclear how the FDA will view the results, given the drug missed its main goals.

William H. Thies, chief medical and scientific officer for the Alzheimer's Association, which was not involved in Lilly's research, said the statistical significance of the combined results is important.

"If that can be replicated, that is a major finding," he said. "It's the first time we've been able to change the course of Alzheimer's disease or any part of Alzheimer's disease in people."

But because the drug missed its main goals, Thies said the drug "isn't going to the (FDA) tomorrow to be approved for sale."

If you look through "rose-coloured glasses" at the results, there may be a sign of potential benefit on cognitive tests, said Dr.

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Lilly Drug May Slow Alzheimer's, but Experts Advise Caution
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