The Levels of Creative Thinking and Metacognitive Thinking Skills of Intermediate School in Jordan: Survey Study

By AL-khayat, Majed Mohammad | Canadian Social Science, July 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Levels of Creative Thinking and Metacognitive Thinking Skills of Intermediate School in Jordan: Survey Study


AL-khayat, Majed Mohammad, Canadian Social Science


Abstract

This study is aimed at investigating the levels of creative and metacognitive thinking skills among students as well as the effect of student's gender on creative and metacognitive thinking skills in the intermediate stage at Al-Balqa Province in Jordan. The method of stratified sampling was selected for the purpose of this study. The metacognitive inventory consisted of (52) items, and Torrance test (Figure B), has been Applied on (372) students. The results showed that there were statistical significant differences between the average performance of males and females on the creative and metacognitive thinking for the benefit of males as well as a high level of Metacognitive thinking from the viewpoint of the students. The researcher recommended that further studies should be focus on training programs for students on metacognitive skills and impact on educational achievement and creative thinking.

Key Words: Metacognitive thinking skills; Creative thinking skills; Education; Gender

INTRODUCTION

Many teachers in Jordan believe that developing the capabilities of student thinking is the goal of education. Thinking and enhancing skills for students is an important goal for education, and schools should exert efforts to provide opportunities for students thinking, especially for those talent students. However, this goal is often effected by reality in practice, because educational system does not provide sufficient experience of thinking such as creative or metacognitive thinking skills, while schools rarely provide students opportunities to carry out their missions in learning stems, although the majority of workers in the education field convinced that the importance of developing students thinking skills is talented. They argue that the mission of the school is not a process of filling the minds of students with information, but to the extent of developing thinking and creativity. There are many bad practices and behaviors still prevalent in schools, which opposes this concept that believe the teacher is the first and last.

Teachers depend on some students for answering questions. They do not give the students enough time to think and answer the questions. Most of the questions are simple and do not require high thinking skills. They also don't care about the way of students thinking as a learnable process, which includes a variety of patterns that range form high complexities to simplicity in thought and abstractness (Harris, 2002). Solving the complexities of student-creativity problems is not only by changing classical teaching methods but also by simplifying the context and ways of how to tackle the issue. Students need not to learn or develop basic skills of drafting, and technical drafting; they should be aware of the process and progress of their way of thinking and creativity. They should have a link with the degree of simplicity or complexity, which they are using in their design. Students' needs are essential for developing the use of terms, how to integrate them into their designs and how digits and numbers can formulate the concepts. All of this should be based on processes that will guide students to stages of one exercise and the different exercises. It should be emphasized that creativity actually represents a set of skills and processes. By examining literature related to the creative process one can begin to develop a theoretical understanding of creativity and identify essential skills and behaviors. The process of creative thinking is considered as one of the mental cognitive processes, which an individual practices during his daily life as the case with the metacognitive thinking (Beyer, 1987; Swartz & Perkinsn, 1990). The metacognitive thinking skills are teachable one, if given an appropriate time and planning carefully. There is a need to teach students metacogitive thinking and skills, especially the talented ones, either as part of the curriculum or as separate way. …

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