Sea Mail


KOREAN CONFLICT AND KOREAN WAR

In "Iowa's New Home Port," in the September issue, Kit Bonner says, "All four of the Jowa-class fought sequentially during the Korean Conflict. . ." The correct name for what used to be called the Korean Conflict is the Korean War. The change was part of the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999, Public Law 105-261 (Sec. 1067). Hence, the name of the memorial in Washington, DC, is the Korean War Veterans Memorial.

James D. Sheppard

Greenville, SC

MORE ON U-851 LOSS

In the book German U-boat Losses in WWII, which I consider the ultimate authority on the subject, author Dr. Axel Niesbie, states that U-851 last reported its position on 27 March 1944 as 42.20N by 46.30W while outbound to the Gulf of Aden in the Indian Ocean. This position is in the Atlantic and thus there is no conclusive proof that the U-boat ever reached the Indian Ocean.

U-851 was posted missing 8 June when it failed to reportedly signal its position. There is no Allied attack of record to account for its sinking, nor is there an explanation for its loss. U851 was one of the 28 newer Type LXD-2 long-range submarines that carried crews of about 70 men.

The correct rank of commanding officer Hannes Weingartner was Korvetten Kapitan, or Lieutenant Commander. Thanks for a most intriguing story and wonderful magazine.

Vernon J. Miller

Creedmore, NC

DISLIKES JUNE COVER

As a long time newsstand buyer of Sea Classics I have to complain that I found your June camouflaged ship cover art to be a very poor choice for a nationally distributed magazine. As a cross-country truck driver gone from home sometimes weeks at a time, I prefer to buy my copy at the newsstand rather than have it sent to a home I'm seldom at.

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