The Facts of the China-Japan Dispute over the Diaoyutais

China Post, September 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Facts of the China-Japan Dispute over the Diaoyutais


Tensions are rising in the dispute between China and Japan over the Diaoyutai Islands - five tiny islands and three rocks covering a mere 7 square kilometers in the East China Sea.

It is a pity that this is happening, especially when Chinese-Japanese economic ties have reached a new level since the end of last year with the two countries agreeing to use their respective currencies in their bilateral trade, instead of the U.S. dollar.

To de-escalate tensions, Japan should make the first move. It was the Japanese government's purchase of three of the islands from the Kurihara family on Sept. 11 that ignited the present crisis. That decision should be rescinded immediately.

In fact, Japan has been upping the ante on the Diaoyutais - which Japan calls the Senkaku Islands - for some time now. One may recall that on Sept. 7, 2010 when a Chinese fishing boat collided accidentally with a Japanese patrol vessel near the Diaoyutais, the captain and crew of the Chinese boat were detained by the Japanese Coast Guard for a few days.

Though they were all released in the end, the incident revealed a new toughness on the part of the Japanese. The Chinese have been reacting to this and other such incidents.

What explains this new toughness? Some analysts attribute it partly to the growth of the political Right in Japanese politics. Japanese economic stagnation for more than two decades and China's success in replacing Japan as the world's second most important economy have increased the influence of conservative nationalist forces in the country who are now targeting China. Impending elections within the ruling Democratic Party and the forthcoming General Election have also widened the berth for conservative politics.

It is also not a coincidence that the Japanese Right has become more vocal - especially vis-a-vis China - at a time when the United States is seeking to re-assert its presence and its power in the Asia-Pacific region. In the last couple of years, U.S. political and military officials have on a number of occasions underscored the significance of U.S.-Japan security ties. Even on the Diaoyutais dispute, the U.S. government, while professing to remain neutral, has through the Pentagon made it clear that the Japan-U.S. Security Treaty would come into force in the event of a military conflict between Japan and China. This stance has to be viewed in the larger context of the U.S.' active military alignment with the Philippines in its recent clash with China over the Huangyan Island in the South China Sea and its support for Vietnam in its longstanding tiff with China over parts of the Spratly Islands and the Paracels.

For both Japan and the U.S. there may also be other reasons why the Diaoyutai Islands are important. In 1968-69, a United Nations agency, it is reported, discovered potential oil and gas reserves near the Diaoyutais. The U.S. military, it is not widely known, also uses one of the five islands - Kuba - as a practice range for aircraft bombing.

Whatever the reasons for holding on to the Diaoyutais, Japan's claim to ownership is weak.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Facts of the China-Japan Dispute over the Diaoyutais
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.