Women Artists of the West Show

By Rintala, Laura | Southwest Art, November 2012 | Go to article overview

Women Artists of the West Show


Rintala, Laura, Southwest Art


RS Hanna Gallery, November 15-December 15

ON NOVEMBER 15, RS Hanna Gallery opens the Women Artists of the West 42nd annual National Exhibition, comprising over 130 juried works from more than 70 member and guest artists. Although once limited to western-themed works or artists who lived in the West, today the organization includes artists from all over the United States and broader subject matter. Special events for the show include artists' demonstrations and a paint-out on the weekend of December 7-9 and an artists' reception and awards presentation on Friday, December 7, from 6 to 8 p.m. Here we introduce you to a few WAOW members, many of whom are participating in this year's show.

Oil painter Leslie Allen creates loosely rendered works featuring landscapes, figures, birds, and flowers. Carol Amos captures the landscapes and florals of her Arizona home. Flowering cacti, and the animals that frequent and inhabit them, are favorite subjects.

Jeannie Breeding has traveled to six continents to gather reference material for her impressionistic landscapes, visiting countries such as China, New Zealand, Greece, and Spain. Heather Coen works in oils and pastels for her landscape, animal, and still-life paintings. She frequently depicts favorite wilderness scenes in the Mountain West.

Judy Fairley's preferred mediums are pastel and scratchboard. Her works include western wildlife, from bears to hummingbirds; domestic and exotic cats; and cowboy scenes. Still-life artist Barbarajones employs classic chiaroscuro in dramatic paintings that capture the beauty of ordinary objects, from ripe fruits to vintage linens. …

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