Ethics, Business and Society: Managing Responsibility

By Joshi, Jyoti | South Asian Journal of Management, July-September 2012 | Go to article overview

Ethics, Business and Society: Managing Responsibility


Joshi, Jyoti, South Asian Journal of Management


Ethics, Business and Society: Managing Responsibility By Ananda Das Gupta Response Business Books from SAGE, Year 2010, p. 212, Price: 7495 ISBN-978-81-321-0402-5 (PB)

The brief background of the book: Ethics, business and society is an Edited book by Ananda under Response Business Books from Sage publication. The book is divided into two sections which covers various topics covering several concerns related to ethics and CSR.

The very prologue of the book makes the reader interested in the book since it attempts to include various perspectives by which Business Ethics can be judged such as perspective of the employee, perspective of the commercial enterprise and perspective of society as a whole. Interestingly, Das starts the book by the difference between responsibility and ethics for that reason business ethics and social responsibility- describing the social responsibility movement in 1960s.

Moral appeal of the book is very high as it pushes the corporate to a social responsibility verge, "people insist that the activities of corporations should make a positive contribution not only to the economic development and stability of the countries in which they operate, but also to their social and environmental development. Failure to respond such an agenda satisfactorily will contribute to increased social tensions, environmental degradation and political upheavals. Good corporate conduct makes an important contribution to sustainable development in any community and thus goes a long way towards responding to the concerns that globalization raises."

The books begins with the concept of society, business, ethics and broader canvas in section one. Business ethics by Arabinda Ray in section one builds the introduction and relevance of the ethics by exploring the presence of ethics in every walk of life going back to the prime base values of human behavior like egoism and greed of course giving it a personal touch. Setting examples such as Aristotle's 'golden mean in every situation' establishes the credibility of the concept of business ethics. Arabinda Ray well states that in our time god is replaced by reason. In earlier days god used to play a controlling factor and behavior/actions were based on this moral premises in every situation. But in our time since religion is replaced by reason so a careful handling of reason is imperative, "from the guilds of olden times to the modern age accountancy, all trade and professional bodies have tried to establish guidance rules which when pursued by practitioners give a sense of being ethical." The situation like this which is filled with difficult choices is compared with classic example of Arjuna in Mahabharata. Ray admits that there will be frequent conflict between the 'immediate business interest and the wider aspects of social imperative or public morality, where a responsible person's ethical sense must dominate.' After discussing aspects like corruption and employees and contribution of companies Ray concluded on note of value system commonly shared by business at large and not specific to an organization.

After a discussion on concepts like morality Bibek opens another analysis of Governance and Economic Development starting as early as concepts of Adam Smith also admitting that the focus of policy has changed, as well as growth theory and development theory. After a handful of examples on measuring and quantifying economic development Bibek argues that good governance is a requirement specially in context of India. "The Preamble to the Indian Constitution states, 'we the People of India... do hereby adopt, enact and give to ourselves this constitution.' The constitution and the governance structure was given to the citizens of a free country by the citizens of a free country by citizens themselves. Yet, the structure that delivers governance often reflects a colonial legacy, a 'we versus they' syndrome -where the 'they', the citizens, are invariably supplicants and 'we' are the ones who deliver administration'. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ethics, Business and Society: Managing Responsibility
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.